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All Things Considered on WAMC HD2

Weekdays, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.; Weekends, 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Weekdays, Ari Shapiro, Mary Louise Kelly, Audie Cornish & Ailsa Chang; Weekends, Michel Martin

All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

LEILA FADEL, HOST:

Government Contracting Disparities Hurting Minority Businesses

17 hours ago

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Singer, writer and producer Natasha Khan moved to LA to write scripts and music for film after her 2016 release, The Bride. The release marked the end of her recording contract with EMI and she wasn't sure she'd write another album as Bat for Lashes.

On Valentine's Day, Huey Lewis and The News released Weather — what might be the last album in a career that has spanned four decades. That's because the band's frontman and namesake can no longer hear his own music as it sounds.

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For years now, more and more people have been embracing their natural hair. They're choosing to let it curl rather than straightening it with heat and chemicals. And if you're part of the curly hair community, you know this natural hair movement runs deep.

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And finally today, I'm sure many of you remember this song.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE POWER OF LOVE")

HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS: (Singing) That's the power of love. That's the power of love.

FADEL: "The Power Of Love" helped make Huey Lewis and the News one of the most iconic musical acts of the 1980s. Now they're back with a new album, "Weather," the band's first album of original songs in nearly 20 years.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WHILE WE'RE YOUNG")

Valentine's Day is one of the busiest days of the year for those who work in restaurants. It's also a day that many in the industry love to hate.

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In Kenya today, some men are boycotting Valentine's Day and going instead to men's empowerment conferences. NPR's Eyder Peralta joined me earlier from Nairobi with some of the attendees.

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Chunlin Leonhard spends most of her time alone in her room at a hotel at the Travis Air Force Base in California, anxiously reading the latest news about the coronavirus outbreak in China.

"I'm doing about as well as can be hoped for under the circumstances," Leonhard, 55, a New Orleans law professor, says during an interview over Skype.

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Scientists can get very excited about what they study, and that means they can be pretty jazzed when what they study gets turned into one of the official emojis of the world and enters our shared visual language.

But sometimes that enthusiasm is tempered by more complex feelings, which is the case with some of the latest emojis that are about to hit our smartphones.

Consider the "rock" emoji.

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In New Hampshire, polls are starting to close in the first primary election of 2020. And to get an early look on how the race is shaking out, we're joined by NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Welcome back.

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Two historic bonsai trees have been stolen, and the Pacific Bonsai Museum in Federal Way, Wash., is putting out a call to get them back.

"These are priceless treasures that belong to our community. And their stories deserve to be preserved and shared broadly," museum Executive Director Kathy McCabe tells NPR. "So please bring them back."

Around 7 a.m. on Sunday morning, two thieves forced their way into the public display of the museum and made off with two roughly 50-pound bonsai: a Japanese black pine and a silverberry.

There was a time when congressional Republicans railed against the budget deficit. In recent history, think of the Tea Party movement, whose members called for driving down debt, deficits and government spending.

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Copyright 2020 Houston Public Media News 88.7. To see more, visit Houston Public Media News 88.7.

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Finally today, got snacks? The Academy Awards are today, the capstone event to the awards season in Hollywood that began with the Golden Globes.

(SOUNDBITE OF 2020 GOLDEN GLOBES)

SCARLETT JOHANSSON: And the Golden Globe goes to Awkwafina.

Author Interview: 'Usual Cruelty'

Feb 9, 2020

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President Trump celebrated his acquittal this week by lashing out at political rivals and firing two officials who testified before impeachment investigators about his involvement in the Ukraine scandal.

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