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All Things Considered is a NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

A year ago, on January 23, 2020, China imposed an absolute lockdown in the Chinese city of Wuhan.

Home: It's where a lot of us have been spending our time since March 2020. For Mike Milosh, leader of the R&B music collective Rhye, the word has taken on new meaning — he's gone from life on the road to a more permanent idea of home at his house outside Los Angeles, where he created his latest studio album. But the sound of this record was conceived well before the pandemic: It began with the idea of wanting to include a choir, which led to Milosh inviting the Danish National Girls' Choir to come to the U.S.

President Biden is promising kinder, more welcoming immigration policies – and raising hopes for asylum seekers throughout the hemisphere.

Earlier this week, Guatemalan police beat back a caravan of thousands of Hondurans who were beginning the long trek to the U.S. border. Moreover, conditions driving people from their home countries — crime, violent spouses, joblessness and hurricane destruction — are not going away.

And this is what makes Texas border mayors nervous.

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The first time I met Corine Dehabey, Barack Obama was president, and Dehabey was busy helping Syrian refugee families settle in Toledo, Ohio. She helps run an organization called Us Together.

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Ever since former Georgia Sen. Kelly Loeffler denounced the WNBA's support for Black Lives Matter last summer, players have been pressuring the league to force her to sell her stake in the Atlanta Dream basketball team.

Now, according to the WNBA, a deal for the sale of the team "is close to being finalized." The league did not release any further details.

In 1968, Dusty Springfield — then an established pop star in the U.K. — flew across the pond to conquer the U.S. by signing what was meant to be a long-term deal with Atlantic Records. The label sent Springfield down to American Sound Studio in Memphis, Tenn., hoping to impart some of the Southern soul magic that had worked so well for Wilson Pickett and Aretha Franklin. Those sessions are now collected in the new anthology Dusty Springfield: The Complete Atlantic Singles 1968-1971.

On a recent Friday afternoon, the critical care charge nurse at a South Los Angeles hospital tries to send another nurse off to grab lunch. Maria Arechiga is interrupted by the beeping of an alarm, the vitals of a patient declining, organs failing.

She dons a surgical gown and unzips a plastic tarp that hangs from the doorway of a hospital room — a makeshift isolation room on this floor temporarily transformed into a larger intensive care unit to make space for the patients that just keep coming. She slips inside.

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A deal for the sale of the Atlanta Dream women's basketball team is close to being finalized. The WNBA has not said who's buying the team, but the current owners include former Georgia Senator Kelly Loeffler, a Republican. The team's mostly Black players wanted the league to force her to sell after the candidate came out against Black Lives Matter during her senatorial campaign. NPR's Emma Peaslee reports.

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A deal for the sale of the Atlanta Dream women's basketball team is close to being finalized. The WNBA has not said who's buying the team, but the current owners include former Georgia Senator Kelly Loeffler, a Republican. The team's mostly Black players wanted the league to force her to sell after the candidate came out against Black Lives Matter during her senatorial campaign. NPR's Emma Peaslee reports.

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And we close tonight with the words of Amanda Gorman, the youngest inaugural poet in U.S. history. Gorman recited her poem "The Hill We Climb" on the steps of the U.S. Capitol. Here is part of that reading.

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As a new president is inaugurated, we're hearing from people who were on this program during the past four years to find out what they hope for in the next four years.

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Well, I don't need to tell you that in this divided nation, there are widely divergent emotions around today's transition of power. NPR's Tovia Smith has been out speaking to voters in Massachusetts. She joins us now.

Hey, Tovia.

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Today, Joe Biden became the 46th president of the United States in an inauguration ceremony unlike any other in this country's history.

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On Joe Biden's inauguration day, we're checking back with some of our guests from the last four years to tell us what they hope for in the next four years.

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When Vice President-elect Kamala Harris was on the campaign trail in 2019, she loved entering events with the energy of a drum line.

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That report was produced by NPR senior arts editor Tom Cole, which we would not normally mention, except Tom is retiring this week after 33 years at NPR. Congratulations, Tom. Our critic Bob Mondello has thoughts.

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers spread out across the country to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings and sidewalks to locate those who are living outside.

But this year, because of the pandemic, the annual street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the nation's unsheltered population appears to be growing.

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Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

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I was thinking about the inauguration this week. I've been a journalist a long time, which means I've been to more inaugurations than I can count. And I'm talking about the gamut — I'm talking county council to president. I'm talking boxed Pepperidge Farm cookie and coffee-urn affairs where you mix and mingle with the newly elected official's mom, to the not quite front-row tickets within arms length of famous people events, complete with fancy party invitations.

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Let's talk more about the inauguration now. Even though the festivities are pared back this year, some people are still finding ways to honor the incoming administration.

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