Dana Farrington

Dana Farrington is a digital editor coordinating online coverage on the Washington Desk — from daily stories to visual feature projects to the weekly newsletter. She has been with the NPR Politics team since President Trump's inauguration. Before that, she was among NPR's first engagement editors, managing the homepage for NPR.org and the main social accounts. Dana has also worked as a weekend web producer and editor, and has written on a wide range of topics for NPR, including tech and women's health.

Before joining NPR in 2011, Dana was a web producer for member station WAMU in Washington, D.C.

Dana studied journalism at New York University and got her first taste of public radio in high school on a teen radio show for KUSP in Santa Cruz, Calif.

A day after the Justice Department said a North Carolina law violates the Civil Rights Act, the state House speaker says lawmakers will not meet the DOJ's deadline to respond.

Finger-lickin' good?

KFC in Hong Kong is marketing edible nail polish that tastes like — wait for it — chicken.

"Yes, it is actually a real thing," the agency running the campaign tells The New York Times.

People are voting in local elections across the U.K. on Thursday, but there is extra attention focused on London's mayoral contest. If the race goes as many pollsters expect, the city could have its first Muslim mayor.

Parliament members Sadiq Khan of the Labour Party and Zac Goldsmith of the Conservative Party are the front-runners in the field of about a dozen candidates vying to replace Conservative Mayor Boris Johnson.

Time to check your frozen fruit and vegetable packages: CRF Frozen Foods has expanded a voluntary recall to include about 358 products under 42 different brands because of potential listeria contamination.

A full list of the items to avoid was included in the company's press release on Monday. The recall includes all frozen organic and nonorganic fruit and vegetable products manufactured or processed at CRF's facility in Pasco, Wash., since May 1, 2014.

Impressed, we are. With your #StarWarsDay celebrations, that is. The fourth is strong on the Interwebs.

It's a time for Star Wars-themed treats.

(Even here at NPR.)

And an excuse to show your creative side.

Of course, even this sacred day is not free of the presidential campaign.

The vessel that British explorer Capt. James Cook used to sail to Australia in the late 1700s may lie at the bottom of Newport Harbor, R.I.

The HMS Endeavour, later called the Lord Sandwich, is believed to be among a group of ships scuttled there as a blockade during the American Revolution. The Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project, a nonprofit that does maritime history and marine archaeology research, says there is an 80 percent to 100 percent chance the Endeavour is still in the port.

The Marine Corps is investigating whether some of the six men in the photo of the 1945 flag-raising in Iwo Jima, Japan, were misidentified after two amateur historians raised questions about the famous image and statue.

The Marine Corps confirmed the review in a statement emailed to NPR. It said:

Detroit's public school teachers say they will return to their classrooms on Wednesday. Detroit schools were closed for two days, after many teachers called in sick to protest a budget shortfall that could mean no pay for hours they've already worked.

The announcement from the Detroit Federation of Teachers came hours after Michigan lawmakers advanced a $500 million plan to restructure Detroit public schools by creating a new district, The Associated Press reports.

More than 90 Detroit public schools were closed Monday because of a teacher "sickout" over pay.

The public schools will run out of money after June "unless Michigan lawmakers approve hundreds of millions of dollars in long-term aid," Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek tells our Newscast unit.

Without that longer-term funding, teachers who spread their paychecks throughout the year would not get paid for work they had already done.

Cwiek reports:

Yes, it's been a couple of days, but we felt compelled to share:

At 100 years old, Ida Keeling set a new world record for the 100-meter dash on Saturday at Penn Relays in Philadelphia.

She completed the race against competitors 80 and up in 1 minute and 17.33 seconds — the fastest time recorded for a centenarian. (For comparison's sake, Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt holds the 100-meter world record of 9.58 seconds.)

In May 2011, Osama bin Laden was killed by a team of Navy SEALs in Abbotabad, Pakistan. To mark five years since the death of the man whose terrorist network carried out the Sept. 11 attacks, the CIA posted a series of tweets re-creating the raid.

A friend of the man accused of shooting and killing nine people in a historically black church in Charleston, S.C., last year has pleaded guilty to failing to report a crime and lying to federal investigators.

Joey Meek, 21, could get up to eight years in prison, reports South Carolina Public Radio's Alexandra Olgin. She adds that attorney Deborah Barbier spoke on Meek's behalf in court on Friday, saying:

What do you get in Cracker Jack? A QR code, apparently.

The "Prize Inside" will no longer actually be inside the box, Frito-Lay has announced. Like so many other aspects of our lives, the prize will be digitized.

It might not have been a drone that struck a British Airways plane on April 17 after all.

British Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin told Parliament on Thursday that it was probably "not a drone incident," according to The Register, an online tech publication.

A former reserve deputy in Oklahoma who said he mistook his gun for his Taser when he shot and killed a suspect has been convicted of second-degree manslaughter. Robert Bates, 74, was a volunteer with the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office when he killed Eric Harris during a sting operation in April 2015.

Missouri's so-called religious freedom bill may be dead for this year. The amendment to the state Constitution would have protected people who didn't want to provide services related to same-sex marriages, including clerks, clergy and businesses.

Wednesday's 6-6 vote by a House committee stopped the measure from advancing, The Associated Press reports. Three Republicans joined three Democrats in opposition, the AP says.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert admitted at his sentencing hearing Wednesday that he sexually abused more than one student when he was a teacher and wrestling coach in Illinois decades ago, and said he was "ashamed."

Hastert initially said he had "mistreated" athletes, NPR's David Schaper tweeted from the courtroom. He added: "What I did was wrong and I regret it."

The Indian government will require all new mobile phones to have a "panic button" beginning in 2017, "to help our women in distress," the communications and information technology minister tweeted on Tuesday.

The Telecommunications Ministry said the emergency call would be made by holding down a designated key on the phone, according to Bloomberg.

This post was updated at 7:45 p.m. ET.

A central neighborhood in Boston had been left out of Amazon's plans for free same-day delivery in the city. The company said on Tuesday that will change.

A Bloomberg analysis last week showed that the predominantly black Roxbury community did not have access to the Amazon Prime service, which is offered to all adjacent neighborhoods. After looking at nationwide data, Bloomberg called the disparity in Boston "the most striking."

A Dutch dentist has been sentenced to eight years behind bars for harming patients in a rural French town. The so-called dentist of horror injured more than 100 patients and committed insurance fraud in Chateau-Chinon, which reportedly had been without a dental care provider for years.

Jacobus Van Nierop, 51, isn't allowed to practice dentistry anymore, and he has to pay about $11,900, according to the BBC.

This post was updated at 8:30 p.m. ET.

A man who says he was sexually abused by former House Speaker Dennis Hastert has sued the Illinois Republican. The alleged victim says he received only $1.7 million of $3.5 million Hastert promised him to keep quiet, NPR's David Schaper reports.

Hastert is scheduled to be sentenced on Wednesday for crimes related to the hush money. He pleaded guilty to structuring cash withdrawals to get around requirements that the bank report big transactions to the federal government.

This post was updated at 6:15 p.m. ET.

More than 550,000 people have signed a pledge to boycott Target over its restroom and dressing-room policy.

The nation's gynecologists say that breast cancer survivors should have the option of using topical estrogen to relieve symptoms such as painful sex and urinary tract infections.

Tell her how you really feel: Dr. Julie Holland is asking women to embrace their inner "moody bitches."

Let me back up.

The Manhattan-based psychiatrist has noticed a shift in her female patients. Twenty years ago, when Holland started her practice, she says, patients came to her because they were having trouble sleeping, were crying frequently or generally not feeling well — "but not really understanding what was going on with them and not really knowing what to do about it."

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

At least 14 people are dead and 17 wounded after a shooting Wednesday morning in San Bernardino, Calif.

The violent day ended with a police chase and shootout and the deaths of two suspects: Syed Farook, 28, and Tashfeen Malik, 27, who were responsible for the attack at the Inland Regional Center, according to San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan.

Follow the Two-Way blog for the latest information. Here are images of Wednesday's events:

More than 300 people are dead the day after an earthquake hit Afghanistan and shook surrounding countries. At least 2,000 people are injured, NPR's Philip Reeves reports on Morning Edition.

"This is a very remote landscape," Reeves notes, "and it can take a long time before you find out exactly who's been impacted by a disaster of this kind."

Updated at 7:24 p.m. ET

The death toll continues to climb from the massive earthquake that rocked northeast Afghanistan near its border with Pakistan. More than 260 people are confirmed dead across the region with the majority of the reported casualties in Pakistan.

The epicenter of the magnitude 7.5 earthquake struck a remote area of Afghanistan but could be felt across the region as far north as Tajikistan and as far south as India.

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