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51% Show # 1089

http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/wamc/local-wamc-899006.mp3

Albany, NY – Immigrant women in the United States try to stay below the radar - and that can be dangerous. They are mistreated in the workplace, separated from their families, avoid critical health care because they fear deportation. Women's eNews did a year-long study and called the resulting articles "Dynamic Diaspora." Editor in Chief Rita Henley Jensen testified before Congressional staffers on what they found.

12:00 Rita Henley Jensen

Rita Henley Jensen is Editor in Chief of Womens eNews. You can find the entire series on their website at womensenews.org.

The GI Bill is credited with changing the American economy - making college possible for millions of American Veterans. The Post 9-11 GI Bill took effect in 2009 and the federal government expected more than half a million soldiers headed back to school that fall. Montana Public Radio Reporter Emilie Ritter has more from a University of Montana Helena student who probably wouldn't be where she was without the GI Bill.

GI BILL Runs 2:31

Reporter Emilie Ritter filed that report from Montana.

And finally, cassette tapes and today's computer based recording programs make it easy to create your own podcasts, mp3s and recordings. But back in the 1940s, it was a far more complicated project. Kathleen Barrett Price and her family were grieving - a son had been killed in World War II. But as the war raged on, they used a Wilcox-Gay Recordio home disk recorder in the basement below the family's grocery store and tavern in St. Louis to make a record of their gatherings, and create an audio snapshot of a piece of American history. Her daughter, Susan Barrett Price, created this audio collage.

WWII Audio Runs 6:00

That story comes to us from freelance journalist Susan Barrett Price.