texas

The play, “Ann,” is an intimate, brash, and feisty portrait of Ann Richards, legendary Governor of Texas. 

Written by award-winning actress and writer Holland Taylor, “Ann” is an inspiring and hilarious play that brings us face to face with the complex, colorful, and captivating character bigger than the state from which she hailed. The Dorset Theatre Festival production is performed by two-time Tony nominee Jayne Atkinson (“House of Cards,” "Madam Secretary”) and directed by Kristen van Ginhoven. 

Lawrence Wright is a staff writer for The New Yorker and the author of nine previous books of nonfiction, including "In the New World," "Remembering Satan," "The Looming Tower," "Going Clear," "Thirteen Days in September," and "The Terror Years," and one novel, "God's Favorite." His books have received many prizes and honors, including a Pulitzer Prize for "The Looming Tower." He is also a playwright and screenwriter.

His new book, "God Save Texas," is a journey through the most controversial state in America. It is a red state in the heart of Trumpland that hasn't elected a Democrat to a statewide office in more than twenty years; but it is also a state in which minorities already form a majority.

Stefan Merrill Block and book cover for "Oliver Loving"
Author Photo: Beowulf Sheehan

Stefan Merrill Block frequently covers bleak territory in his novels, and his latest, “Oliver Loving,” is no exception.

Block takes us inside the mind of a comatose West Texas teen who has been hit in the head during a mass shooting on the night of his high school prom.

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The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation announced this week that it is sending 22 drones across the state to “enhance environmental management, conservation and emergency response efforts.” The "unmanned aerial vehicles" have already proven their worth in hurricane-ravaged Texas.

People in Houston, Texas have begun the arduous work of cleaning and reconstructing the city as floodwaters from Harvey have receded.
Rossana Coto-Batres

People in and around Houston, Texas have begun the arduous work of cleaning and reconstructing the city as floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey have receded.  WAMC's Capital Region Bureau Chief Dave Lucas spoke with Albany’s Rossana Coto-Batres, who is working with immigrants on Harvey relief there.

Piper Perish inhales air and exhales art. The sooner she and her best friends can get out of Houston and get to New York City, the better. Art school has been Piper's dream forever, and now that senior year is halfway over, she's never felt more ready.

But in the final months before graduation, things are weird with her friends and stressful with three different guys, and Piper's sister's tyranny thwarts every attempt at happiness for the Perish family. Piper's art just might be enough to get her out. But is she brave enough to seize that power when it means giving up so much?

Piper Perish is a new novel by Kayla Cagan.

The Academy of Music Theatre is mounting a new work by playwright Carol Carpenter entitled Sweet, Sweet Spirit on March 24th and 25th at 7:30 p.m.  The play addresses gay bashing and child abuse within a West Texas conservative family whose gay teenage son is beaten into a coma by his father.

Carpenter takes her audience deeper into an exploration of a family struggling with their own fear and heart.  The son, Tyler, who is described as “different,” but not referred to by his family members as gay, affects each of the members of this Southern Christian family in disparate ways.

We are joined Debra J'Anthony, Academy of Music Theatre's Executive Director and Sheila Siragusa, director of Sweet, Sweet Spirit.

  In The Boys in the Bunkhouse: Servitude and Salvation in the Heartland, New York Times writer and columnist Dan Barry tells the harrowing yet uplifting story of the exploitation and abuse of a resilient group of men with intellectual disability, and the heroic efforts of those who helped them to find justice and reclaim their lives.

In the tiny Iowa farm town of Atalissa, dozens of men, all with intellectual disability and all from Texas, lived in an old schoolhouse. Before dawn each morning, they were bussed to a nearby processing plant, where they eviscerated turkeys in return for food, lodging, and $65 a month. They lived in near servitude for more than thirty years, enduring increasing neglect, exploitation, and physical and emotional abuse—until state social workers, local journalists, and one tenacious labor lawyer helped these men achieve freedom.

  "Whoever said you can't get sober for someone else never met my mother, Mama Jean. When I came to in a Manhattan emergency room after an overdose to the news that she was on her way from Texas, I panicked. She was the last person I wanted to see on that dark September morning, but the person I needed the most."

So begins this astonishing memoir ― by turns both darkly comic and deeply poignant ― about this native Texan's long struggle with alcohol, his complicated relationship with Mama Jean, and his sexuality. The book is listed as “Required Reading” in Mary Karr’s bestselling The Art of Memoir and was a Book Chase Top 10 Nonfiction Book of 2015.

1/8/15 Panel

Jan 8, 2015

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post and Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld.

Scheduled discussion topics include: Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris, Texas abortion rules, Sen. Elizabeth Warren's message on the middle class; Antibiotic news.

1/7/15 Panel

Jan 7, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, political consultant Libby Post, and WAMC newsman, Ray Graf.

Topics include: Shootings in France at the offices of Charlie Hebdo and in El Paso at the Veterans Affairs Health Care System's clinic, Gay Marriage in Florida, Robert F. McDonnell sentenced to two years in prison, Boehner beats dissent.

  In June 2013, Texas State Senator Wendy Davis was introduced to the world as a hero to women and the men who love them. Davis stood and spoke on the floor of the state senate for nearly thirteen hours to run out the clock on a sweeping bill that aimed to close all but five women’s health clinics providing access to abortion and lifesaving healthcare in Texas.

During that time, she wasn’t allowed to eat, drink, sit, use the bathroom, speak off-topic, or lean against any furniture. When it was over, everyone from the White House to young women in small Texas towns shared her story. With calls, rallies on the steps of the Texas Capitol, Twitter, Facebook and a host of social media, Wendy Davis—with her pink sneakers—suddenly became a national household name.

9/2/14 Panel

Sep 2, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain & Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
NATO Response Force
Texas Abortion Law Update
Obama: Equal Pay
Joan Rivers
Nude Celebrity Photos Leaked
Bad Blue Light

4/3/14 Panel

Apr 3, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, University at Albany professor and Investigative Journalist Rosemary Armao and Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus, Ira Fusfeld.

Topics include:
Fort Hood
SCOTUS Political Donation Cap
Campaign spending polls
ACA Numbers
Texas Abortion lawsuit

3/28/14 Panel

Mar 28, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf, and Investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
New Search Area for Flight 370
Christie Review
Turkey Twitter Ban
Texas Abortion Law
Lawmaker Stipends

1/21/14 Panel

Jan 21, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
Syria
Christie Troubles
Wendy Davis - Texas
Cuomo Budget
Aging Study
TU Stories

  Texas may well be America’s most controversial state. Evangelicals dominate the halls of power, millions of its people live in poverty, and its death row is the busiest in the country. Skeptical outsiders have found much to be offended by in the state’s politics and attitude. And yet, according to journalist (and Texan) Erica Grieder, the United States has a great deal to learn from Texas.

She joins us to speak about her new book, Big, Hot, Cheap, and Right: What America Can Learn from the Strange Genius of Texas.