Science & Technology

Mark Thomas is using a pay phone, but he isn't paying. And physically, he's not even that close to the phone.

He's sitting on a bench on the street in Astoria, Queens, checking email on his netbook. It's grabbing an Internet signal from a military-grade antenna on top of a pay phone down the block.

"It's not the speediest but you can't complain about free, right?" Thomas says.

Why We Must Keep Reaching For The Stars

Jul 24, 2012

Field Log, Imperial Archeological Expedition IV-V, May 21, 2750 CE: Spent the better part of the day bringing artifacts up from the mud-caves. It's hard to believe what we are finding. It's impossible really. Lifan-Alfred says she has deciphered a good portion of the documents. They speak of rockets and journeys into space. There are even detailed accounts of trips to the moon, seven of them! Some of the technology described in the documents matches closely with the artifacts we are finding. These stories, they could be true.

Jesse Feiler is back in Studio A - this month's topic: the latest in government apps and information.

There's enough DNA in the human body to stretch from the sun to Pluto and back. But don't confuse DNA with your genes, says writer Sam Kean.

"They are sort of conflated in most people's minds today but they really are distinct things," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "Genes are like the story and DNA is the language that the story is written in."

Albany, NY – Listen to Paul Caiano's WAMC Regional forecast above. Updated every weekday morning. Paul Caiano is a meteorologist at WNYT Newschannel 13. He graduated from SUNY Albany in May of 1993 with a B.S. in the field of Atmospheric Science/Meteorology.

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Albany, NY – Jesse Feiler joins us to talk about TweetDeck - and, as Roundtable Producer, Sarah LaDuke, uses it, she joins Joe and Jesse in studio.

Albany, NY – Jesse Feiler (North Country Consulting) and Ryan Davis (Blue State Digital) join Joe to talk about the ways to effectively use Twitter at conferences and events.

Albany, NY – (1718-1799). This brilliant daughter of Italian nobility spoke five languages, wrote the first books on abstract geometry, and dreamed of being a nun.

Albany, NY – (1716-1774). Anna was an artist who sculpted detailed anatomical models out of wax that were used in medical schools for centuries to come.

Albany, NY – (1711-1778). This Italian mother of 12 became the first female professor of physics. She also successfully petitioned her university employer for more responsibility and a higher salary.

Albany, NY – (370?-415 C.E.). Today's students can thank this 4th century mathematician for making geometry courses easier to understand.

Albany, NY – Dr. Karen Hitchcock is currently the Principal and Vice Chancellor of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. She is the former President of The University at Albany, a research University in Upstate New York, where this story took place. Join Dr. Hitchcock for a look at how the president of a University can impact science. For more information, please visit: http://qnc.queensu.ca/story_loader.php?id=409d1ef96b777

Albany, NY – Julie Spicer England began her career with a degree in chemical engineering, but it was her grasp of the scientific process that led her to her work with Texas Instruments. England leads a team that builds the components that go inside our cell phones and cd players. England discusses the work she does, and how she combines science and communications to effectively manage her team at Texas Instruments.

Albany, NY – Medical researchers need tools to conduct measurement and experiments. At Agilent Technologies, Darlene Solomon leads a team of scientists that build those tools. Solomon speaks about her work at Agilent and what it takes to solve challenging problems in science and technology.

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