pulitzer prize

Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Miriam Pawel’s new book: “The Browns of California: The Family Dynasty that Transformed a State and Shaped a Nation,” is a panoramic history of California and its impact on the nation told through the lens of the family dynasty that led the state for nearly a quarter century.

Author, historian and Pulitzer Prize-winner Doris Kearns Goodwin has a new book out today and will be in our region later this month for a pair of events to discuss her latest work, "Leadership: In Turbulent Times."

The book chronicles the journeys of four of our nation’s presidents: Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon B. Johnson. Through those histories, Goodwin explores questions of natural leadership ability versus developed ability; the relationship between ambition and adversity on leader ship growth; and how leaders both perceive themselves and are perceived by others.

Goodwin will be at the FDR Presidential Library in Hyde Park this Saturday at 3 p.m. On September 29 she will be speaking at the Albany Book Festival at the University of Albany and later in the day she will be at the Maple Street School for a Northshire Bookstore event in Manchester Center Vermont at 6 p.m.

Julia Wolfe
Peter Sterling / juliawolfemusic.com

Three decades ago, composers Michael Gordon, David Lang, and Julia Wolfe noticed something missing in the universe of music: a zone between rock, jazz, classical, and folk where new forms of musical expression could find new audiences and new players. So they invented a new world of music, and called it Bang on a Can.

The annual Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival at MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts includes daily performances in the museum galleries, a concert with the Bang on a Can All-Stars, and concludes with a six-hour blow-out Marathon Concert performed by the festival ensembles and special guests.

The festival also features workshops, late-night concerts, free events in North Adams, and more. This year features special festival guest composer Steve Reich.

Pulitzer Prize winning composer and Bang on a Can co-founder Julia Wolfe joins us.

Christopher Lloyd in "Our Town" at Weston Playhouse
Hubert Schriebl

In the small town of Grover’s Corners, ordinary people lead extraordinary lives. The Pulitzer Prize winning "Our Town" is a simple yet profound story of a community, brought to life by Thornton Wilder’s singular voice.

Christopher Lloyd is playing The Stage Manager in Weston Playhouse's production of "Our Town" through July 7.

Lloyd is a beloved American character actor, best known for his work on "Taxi" and in the "Back to the Future" film franchise.

Seymour Hersh's fearless reporting has earned him fame, front-page bylines in virtually every major newspaper in the free world, honors galore, and no small amount of controversy.

Now in this memoir, "Reporter," he describes what drove him and how he worked as an independent outsider, even at the nation's most prestigious publications.

Philip Roth has died at the age of 85. The Pulitzer, National Book Award, and Man Booker International Prize-winning novelist first had success in 1959 with his short story collection, “Goodbye, Columbus.”  A decade later “Portnoy's Complaint” earned him great notoriety and a place in the American canon. His 1997 work, “American Pastoral,” won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

We spoke with Philip Roth in 2008 when his novel “Indignation” was published. In this archival interview we talk about his career and process. 

Lawrence Wright is a staff writer for The New Yorker and the author of nine previous books of nonfiction, including "In the New World," "Remembering Satan," "The Looming Tower," "Going Clear," "Thirteen Days in September," and "The Terror Years," and one novel, "God's Favorite." His books have received many prizes and honors, including a Pulitzer Prize for "The Looming Tower." He is also a playwright and screenwriter.

His new book, "God Save Texas," is a journey through the most controversial state in America. It is a red state in the heart of Trumpland that hasn't elected a Democrat to a statewide office in more than twenty years; but it is also a state in which minorities already form a majority.

David Lang
Peter Serling

Tonight at 7:30, EMPAC will present Pulitzer Prize-winning composer and Bang on a Can co-founder David Lang’s orchestral work, "darker." The evening-length composition will be performed by Ensemble Signal, with live projections by visual artist Suzanne Bocanegra.

David Lang is one of America's most performed composers. He is co-founder and co-artistic director of New York’s legendary music collective Bang on a Can. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the Pulitzer Prize, a Grammy Award, an Academy Award and Golden Globe nomination, a Bessie Award, Obie Award, and more.

WAMC Northeast Public Radio and The New York State Writers Institute present a special Climate Change Roundtable Panel at Page Hall at UAlbany's Downtown Campus featuring the following experts:

  • Judith Enck – Senior Advisor at Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development, former regional administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency under President Barack Obama, and regular Roundtable Panelist
  • Jeff Goodell - a contributing editor for Rolling Stone and a frequent contributor to the New York Times Magazine. His latest book is "The Water Will Come"
  • Elizabeth Kolbert - Pulitzer Prize-winner for "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History," observer on environmentalism for The New Yorker magazine.
  • Terry Tempest Williams - award-winning author of fifteen books, including her latest: "The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America's National Parks"

Alan Chartock

WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock discusses President Trump's rejection of new sanctions against Russia.  Dr. Chartock also discusses this year's Pulitzer Prizes, which were announced Monday.

"High Wire" By Jules Feiffer
rmichelson.com

This morning we meet cartoonist and illustrator Jules Feiffer whose new exhibit, "A Dance to Spring, Astaire, and Getting Old: New Works by Jules Feiffer at 89," is on display at the R. Michelson Galleries in Northampton, Massachusetts through May 31st.

Feiffer’s revolutionary political cartoons were a fixture in the Village Voice from 1956 until 1997. He has also illustrated children’s books including "The Phantom Tollbooth" and "Bark George," wrote plays and screenplays, novels, graphic novels, and animated film shorts. He has received an Oscar, Obie, and a Pulitzer.

There will be an Artist Reception Friday, April 13th 6-8PM in conjunction with Arts Night Out at the galleries.

Colson Whitehead’s novel "The Underground Railroad," tells the story of a runaway slave and re-imagines the pre-Civil War South. It won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book award and it is now out in paperback.

Jake Bernstein was a senior reporter on the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists team that broke the Panama Papers story. In 2017, the project won the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting. Bernstein earned his first Pulitzer Prize in 2011 for National Reporting, for coverage of the financial crisis.

In "Secrecy World," Bernstein explores this shadow economy and how it evolved, drawing on millions of leaked documents from the files of the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca ― a trove now known as the Panama Papers ― as well as other journalistic and government investigations. Bernstein shows how shell companies operate, how they allow the super-wealthy and celebrities to escape taxes, and how they provide cover for illicit activities on a massive scale by crime bosses and corrupt politicians across the globe.

“Manhattan Beach” is the latest from Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Jennifer Egan. It is a haunting and propulsive WWII-era novel that tells the intertwined stories of Anna Kerrigan, a Brooklyn Navy Yard diver, her father Eddie Kerrigan, a longshoreman turned small-time gangster, and Eddie’s connected boss, Dexter Styles.

The culmination of nearly 30 years of reporting on Donald Trump, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter, David Cay Johnston, takes a revealingly close look at the mogul's rise to power and prominence in his new book, "The Making of Donald Trump."

Covering the long arc of Trump’s career, Johnston tells the story of how a boy from a quiet section of Queens, NY would become an entirely new, and complex, breed of public figure. Trump is a man of great media savvy, entrepreneurial spirit, and political clout. Yet his career has been plagued by legal troubles and mounting controversy.

Tyehimba Jess’ poetry serves as a bridge between “slam poetry” and other American verse traditions. His second collection Olio, which celebrates the unrecorded and largely unknown Black musicians and orators of the 19th and early 20th centuries, won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize.

The Cantilena Chamber Choir will present a performance of King David In Words And Music on Saturday, June 3 at 7:30 p.m. at Trinity Church in Lenox, MA

The concert will feature live readings by Pulitzer Prize winning author Geraldine Brooks. She will be reading from her latest international best-selling novel The Secret Chord about the life of King David as the choir sings music for chorus and full orchestra based on corresponding texts by and about King David.

Geraldine Brooks is the author of five novels, her latest, The Secret Chord, the Pulitzer Prize–winning March and the international bestsellers Caleb’s CrossingPeople of the Book, and Year of Wonders

The Cantilena Chamber Choir is comprised of 24 dedicated singers of the highest caliber, who possess vocal training, excellent sight-reading skills and considerable choral experience. Andrea Goodman is the founder and director of the choir.

We welcome Andrea Goodman and Geraldine Brooks to The Roundtable.

G-Man By Stephen Hunter

May 16, 2017

Bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize winner Stephen Hunter joins us this morning. His 10th book in the Bob Lee Swagger saga, G-Man, finds Bob uncovering his family’s secret tommy gun war with 1930s gangsters like John Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson.

Hunter is the author of twenty-one books and there are over two million Hunter novels in print. He is the retired chief film critic for The Washington Post, where he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Criticism. He has also published two collections of film criticism and a nonfiction work, American Gunfight.

USA Network adapted Hunter’s Point of Impact for its highly-rated TV series Shooter, featuring Ryan Phillippe as Bob Lee Swagger. Mark Wahlberg, who starred in the 2007 movie of the same name, is the executive producer of the series. Again, the new novel is G-Man

Will Pullen and Khris Davis in Sweat
Joan Marcus

Playwright Lynn Nottage made history last month as the first woman to win two Pulitzer Prizes for Drama. Her play Sweat — her first to be produced on Broadway — was awarded the honor. She received her first Pulitzer Prize in 2009 for Ruined, which was produced off-Broadway.

Sweat first premiered and was co-commissioned by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and Washington, D.C.’s Arena Stage. After a sold-out run at off-Broadway’s prestigious Public Theater, the play moved to Broadway where it is now running at Studio 54 and is nominated for a Tony Award for Best Play.

Directed by Kate Whoriskey, Sweat takes place in Reading, PA and features characters whose way of life is falling apart after the decline of the manufacturing, steel, and coal industries. They work together and they drink together - and when layoffs and picket lines begin - they find themselves fighting each other in the hard fight to keep going.

We are joined now by actors Khris Davis and Will Pullen - they play best-friends, Chris and Jason in Sweat. (To learn more about Davis and Pullen - their bios are below.)

Over the course of his distinguished career, Pulitzer Prize winner David McCullough has spoken before Congress, the White House, historical societies, and other esteemed institutions -- including Union College in Schenectady.

Now, at a time of self-reflection in America following a bitter election campaign that has left the country divided, McCullough has collected some of his most important speeches in a brief volume designed to identify important principles and characteristics that are particularly American.

The book is entitled The American Spirit: Who We Are and What We Stand For

In Madame President: The Extraordinary Journey of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and bestselling author Helene Cooper tells the harrowing and triumphant story of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, leader of the Liberian women’s movement, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, and the first democratically elected female president in African history.

Helene Cooper is the Pulitzer Prize–winning Pentagon correspondent for The New York Times, having previously served as White House Correspondent, diplomatic correspondent, and the assistant editorial page editor. Prior to moving to the Times, Helene spent twelve years as a reporter and foreign correspondent at The Wall Street Journal.

She is the author of the bestselling memoir, The House at Sugar Beach (Simon & Schuster, 2008). Her new book, Madame President: The Extraordinary Journey of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf will be featured on The Book Show in the near future. In this interview we speak with her about current events and what it's like to be at The Pentagon in the early weeks of the Trump Administration.

In September 1998, Claudia Rowe was a young reporter working as a stringer for the New York Times in Poughkeepsie, New York when local police, confounded by two years of missing-women reports, discovered eight decayed bodies stashed in the home where Kendall Francois lived with his mother, father and teenage sister.

The corpses were found only after Kendall, a polite twenty-seven-year-old, confessed while being booked for something far more routine. He fit few traditional descriptions of a serial murderer, and many in Poughkeepsie struggled to comprehend how this “gentle giant” could be responsible for such brutality.

Reaching out after Kendall’s arrest, Rowe began an intense four-year conversation with the killer through letters, phone calls and face-to-face meetings. Rowe writes about this in her new book, The Spider And The Fly: A Reporter, A Serial Killer, And The Meaning Of Murder.

Claudia Rowe is a staff writer at The Seattle Times and has twice been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. 

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Tracy Kidder's new book, A Truck Full of Money, chronicles the life of Paul English, a kinetic and unconventional inventor, philanthropist and entrepreneur suffering from bipolar disorder, who co-founded the travel website Kayak, which sold for almost 2-Billion dollars.