nyswi

On a summer day in New York Jonathan Santlofer discovers his wife, Joy, gasping for breath on their living room couch. After a frenzied 911 call, an ambulance race across Manhattan, and hours pacing in a hospital waiting room, a doctor finally delivers the fateful news.

Consumed by grief, Jonathan desperately tries to pursue life as he always had--writing, social engagements, and working on his art--but finds it nearly impossible to admit his deep feelings of loss to anyone, not even his to beloved daughter, Doria, or to himself.

Jonathan Santlofer is a writer and artist. His debut novel, "The Death Artist," was an international bestseller, translated into seventeen languages, and is currently in development for screen adaptation. His fourth novel, "Anatomy of Fear," won the Nero Award for best novel of 2009. His short stories have appeared in numerous anthologies. He is also the creator and editor of several anthologies including "It Occurs to Me That I Am America," a collection of original stories and art. His paintings and drawings are included in many public and private collections.

The Creative Life series is produced by UAlbany’s University Art Museum, NYS Writers Institute, and the UAlbany Performing Arts Center in collaboration with WAMC. The series features leading figures from a variety of artistic disciplines in conversation about their creative inspirations, their craft and their careers. At 11am we will air Joe Donahue’s candid conversation with Tony Award winning Broadway star, Patti LuPone.

Two-time Tony and Grammy Award winner Patti LuPone was most recently seen on Broadway in the musical ”War Paint.”

A graduate of the first class of the Drama Division of New York’s Juilliard School and a founding member of The Acting Company in which she toured the country for four years, LuPone went on to be a Broadway superstar for more than 30 years – starting with her Tony-winning performance in “Evita.” 

On Tuesday, February 28th, 2017, the LBJ Presidential Library held An Evening With Cokie Roberts
LBJ Library

Cokie Roberts, one of America’s leading broadcast journalists, is a long-time reporter, news analyst, and commentator for National Public Radio; a commentator and analyst for ABC News; and a regular roundtable analyst for "This Week with George Stephanopoulos."

She was in Albany, New York this week for two events with the New York State Writers Institute. She joined us to talk about her career, journalism and current events.

Broadway legend Patti LuPone will appear at two events in the Capital Region this week. 

On Thursday, April 26 she will join Joe Donahue in a Creative Life conversation about Ms. LuPone’s career and devotion to the arts and high standards therein. The conversation will take place at Page Hall on UAlbany's downtown campus at 7 p.m. The Creative Life series is a major arts initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center and University Art Museum in conjunction with WAMC Northeast Public Radio.

On Friday, April 27, Ms. LuPone will perform "Don't Monkey With Broadway" at Proctors in Schenectady at 8 p.m. "Don’t Monkey with Broadway" features music by the likes of Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart, Jule Styne, Stephen Schwartz, Charles Strouse, Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, Cole Porter and Irving Berlin.

Peter Golden
http://www.petergolden.com

Peter Golden is the author of the new novel, "Nothing Is Forgotten," about a young man from New Jersey who travels to Khrushchev’s Russia, where he discovers love and the long-buried secrets of his heritage.

Golden’s previous novels include "Wherever There Is Light" and "Comeback Love." An award-winning journalist, Golden has interviewed many world leaders, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Henry Kissinger, Yitzhak Rabin, and Mikhail Gorbachev.

Golden will be joined by first-time novelist Sara Nović for a pair of New York State Writers Institute events on April 17.  The events are cosponsored by UAlbany’s Disability Resource Center, State Education Department’s Office of Cultural Education, and Friends of the New York State Library

Garth Fagan and Joe Donahue at UAlbany PAC
© Anthony Tassarotti / www.tassarotti.com

Garth Fagan is the Tony and Olivier award-winning choreographer of "The Lion King" and founder, artistic director and president of Garth Fagan Dance.

On March 28 he visited the University at Albany for an evening of conversation with WAMC's Joe Donahue as part of "The Creative Life" at UAlbany, a collaborative series created and produced by the University Art Museum, Performing Art Center and New York State Writers Institute in collaboration with WAMC.

Archer Mayor
Margot Zalkind

Archer Mayor is a bestselling mystery author and has also worked for decades as a death investigator for Vermont’s Office of the Chief Medical Examiner and as a detective for the Windham County Sheriff’s Office.

His Joe Gunther detective series, begun in 1988, has become one of the most critically acclaimed police procedural series being written today. Set partly in Albany, the 28th and latest book in the series is "Trace." 

The New York State Writers Institute is bringing Mayor to Albany tomorrow (Tuesday, March 27). He will be conducting a Q&A about the craft of mystery writing at 4:15 in the Standish Room at the Science Library of the Uptown Campus; and at 7:30PM he will be part of a conversation entitled: "Corpses, Blow Flies, and Post-Mortem Forensics" with UAlbany Chemistry professor Rabi Musah.

Gish Jen is a beloved and prize-winning chronicler of the Chinese-American experience in fiction. Her new work, "The Girl at the Baggage Claim: Explaining the East-West Culture Gap," explores stark differences between Eastern and Western ideas of the "self."

She will be in Albany, NY for two events sponsored by The New York State Writers Institute on Tuesday, January 30.

Bob Mankoff / The New Yorker

Bob Mankoff, cartoonist and influential cartoon editor for "The New Yorker," submitted more than 500 of his own cartoons to that publication before getting his first acceptance in 1977. He became cartoon editor in 1997, and is credited with nurturing a new generation of talent before retiring this past April.

He currently serves as the Humor and Cartoon Editor at "Esquire." He is the author of the memoir, "How About Never—Is Never Good for You?: My Life in Cartoons."

Mankoff will be in Albany later today with legendary New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast for a New York State Writers Institute seminar at 4:15 this afternoon in the Standish Room at the Science Library on the uptown University at Albany campus. There will be a reading at 8PM tonight in the Huxley Theatre at the New York State Museum in downtown Albany.

In his new book, Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History, NYT bestselling author and co-creator of the Peabody-Award winning public radio show Studio 360, Kurt Andersen, provides a new and comprehensive understanding of our post-truth world and the American instinct in make- believe.

This interview was recorded at UAlbany as part of the New York State Writers Institute symposium: Telling the Truth in a Post-Truth World.

The New York State Writers Institute’s Telling the Truth in a Post-Truth World is a multi-day forum which will explore timely topics critical to an open democratic society including the rise of "fake news" and "alternative facts;" pressures on the First Amendment and a free press; media literacy; information overload; hacking and cybersecurity; and issues of race and class, among others.

Featured appearances will include Kurt Andersen, journalist, editor, radio host, and author of the new book Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History; Bob Schieffer, former anchor of CBS Evening News and Face the Nation; Floyd Abrams, the nation's preeminent First Amendment lawyer; Lydia Polgreen, editor-in-chief of HUFFPOST and more than two dozen prominent journalists, editors, historians, and authors. 

Author and journalist Paul Grondahl is the Director of The New York State Writer’s Institute and he joins us along with Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and founder and Executive Director of the Writers Institute, William Kennedy.

  

Eric Fair, an Army veteran, worked in Iraq as a contract interrogator in 2004. His 2012 Pushcart Prize-winning essay “Consequence,” which was published first in Ploughshares and then in Harper’s Magazine, detailed some of his experiences. Fair expanded the essay into his 2016 book, also titled Consequence. Award-winning journalist and bestselling author Sebastian Junger referred to the memoir as “both an agonized confession and a chilling expose of one of the darkest interludes of the War on Terror.”

Eric Fair will read from his memoir Consequence at 8:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 20 in the Clark Auditorium, New York State Museum, Cultural Education Center in downtown Albany. Earlier that same day, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 375 of the Campus Center on UAlbany’s Uptown Campus the author will hold an informal seminar with audience discussion.  Free and open to the public, the events are cosponsored by the New York State Writers Institute and the Friends of the New York State Library. 

Author Diane Ackerman will read from and discuss her 2007 bestseller The Zookeeper’s Wife, in anticipation of the soon-to-be-released major motion picture based on her book at 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday night at the New York State Museum in Albany.

Earlier that same day, at 4:15 p.m. Ackerman will hold a seminar in on the UAlbany Uptown Campus.  

The events are presented by The New York State Writers Institute.

Diane Ackerman is a naturalist and writer of both prose and poetry. The Zookeeper’s Wife has been adapted for film by Focus Features and is scheduled for release on March 31st. The book and film tell the little known true story of a Warsaw zookeeper’s family that saved 300 Jews during the Holocaust.

The Creative Life: A Conversation Series at UAlbany is an initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center, and University Art Museum, all of which are housed and function on the main campus of the University at Albany. Guests in this inaugural year of the series have included author Joyce Carol Oates and dancer/choreographer Savion Glover who appeared in September and October 2016, respectively.

Regina Carter is a violinist of unbridled artistry and imagination who has brought her exquisite improvisational skills to a broad diversity of styles ranging from classical and soul to African and traditional music of the South. Recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship for “pioneering new possibilities for the violin and for jazz,” she is widely considered to be the foremost jazz violinist of her generation.

She will discuss her career and musical inspirations with Joe Donahue at UAlbany in a New York State Writers Institute event on February 11th at 4:30 p.m.

She will perform at The Egg that evening at 8 p.m. Her recent work involves adaptations of music by Ella Fitzgerald.

Helen Czerski, physicist and BBC television personality, is the author of the new book Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life, which explores the science of popcorn, coffee stains and other ordinary phenomena and links them to more complex issues including climate change, the energy crisis, and medical innovations.

She will be at UAlbany on February 9 in two events presented by The New York State Writer's Institute.

James Lasdun At NYSWI

Nov 15, 2016

It is summer, 2012. Charlie, a wealthy banker with an uneasy conscience, invites his troubled cousin Matthew to visit him and his wife in their idyllic mountaintop house. As the days grow hotter, the friendship between the three begins to reveal its fault lines, and with the arrival of a fourth character, the household finds itself suddenly in the grip of uncontrollable passions. As readers of James Lasdun’s acclaimed fiction can expect, The Fall Guy is a complex moral tale as well as a gripping suspense story, probing questions of guilt and betrayal with ruthless incisiveness.

James Lasdun and Charles Baxter will participate in two events presented by The New York State Writers Institute today.

The Creative Life: A Conversation Series at UAlbany is a new initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center, and University Art Museum, along with WAMC to converse with artists of national and international prominence about their creative inspiration, their craft, their careers, and the demands of sustaining an artistic practice over time. 

Savion Glover is a Tony award-winning choreographer and considered “the greatest tap dancer to ever lace up a pair of tap shoes.” At the age of 10 he starred in the Broadway musical The Tap Dance Kid, which earned seven Tony Award nominations including Best Musical. At the age of 15, he received a Tony nomination for his role in Black and Blue and, three years later, a Drama Desk Award nomination for his role in Jelly’s Last Jam.

He both starred in and choreographed the musical Bring in ’da Noise, Bring in ’da Funk, for which he received the Tony for choreography. In 2016, he earned another Tony nomination for choreography for Shuffle Along. He also performed the live capture dance moves for “Mumble,” the penguin in the Disney film Happy Feet and its sequel. 

This interview was recorded at Page Hall at UAlbany on October 16th. .  Later that night, Glover premiered his latest work New Soundz, at The Egg in Albany. 

Joyce Carol Oates has won the highest honors in American fiction, ranging from the National Book Award to being awarded the National Humanities Medal from President Obama in 2010. She is also a 5-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She has a pair of new books out – one a memoir, one a meditation on writing. 

We spoke to Joyce Carol Oates her as part of The Creative Life: A Conversation Series at The University at Albany. Our conversation was taped in September before a live audience in the University’s Performing Arts Center.