internet

When Mark Zuckerberg changed the mission of Facebook this summer to be focused on community, he hired Jennifer Dulski to lead Groups, at the center of their new strategy, and used by more than one billion people to build meaningful communities around the world.

With a career as a tech executive at Yahoo! and Google, a startup founder and CEO, and a social change leader as president of Change.org, Dulski is now combining her own experience with stories of other inspiring leaders to show how we all have the power to start movements that matter.

In her new book, "Purposeful," she walks through the steps to go from idea to impact and shares specific tips and stories from real movement starters whose movements have created everything from new laws to new companies.

lawgazette.co.uk

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning as we discuss privacy regulations and what's new in Facebook's upcoming discussions.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant specializing in small business and nonprofit organizations. His most recent books are “The Nonprofit Risk Book: Finding and Managing Risk in Nonprofits and NGOs” written with Gail B. Nayowith and “Learn Computer Science with Swift.” His most recent apps are “CyberContinuity,” a free app to learn about your vulnerabilities and “The Nonprofit Risk App,” a companion to the book.

Former Internet entrepreneur Andrew Keen was among the earliest to write about the dangers that the Internet poses to our culture and society. His 2007 book "The Cult of the Amateur" was critical in helping advance the conversation around the Internet, which has now morphed from a tool providing efficiencies and opportunities for consumers and business to an elemental force that is profoundly reshaping our societies and our world.

In his new book, "How to Fix the Future," Keen focuses on what we can do about this seemingly intractable situation. Looking to the past to learn how we might change our future, he describes how societies tamed the excesses of the Industrial Revolution, which, like its digital counterpart, demolished long-standing models of living, ruined harmonious environments, and altered the business world beyond recognition.

Artwork for book "Broad Band"
clairelevans.com

The history of technology you probably know is one of men and machines, garages and riches, alpha nerds and “brogrammers.” But female visionaries have always been at the vanguard of technology and innovation.

In fact, women turn up at the very beginning of every important wave in technology. They may have been hidden in plain sight, their inventions and contributions touching our lives in ways we don't even realize, but they have always been part of the story.

VICE reporter and YACHT lead singer Claire Evans gives these female heroes their due in her new book: "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet."

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to set us straight on online collaboration tools and teleconferencing.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant specializing in small business and nonprofit organizations. His most recent books are “The Nonprofit Risk Book: Finding and Managing Risk in Nonprofits and NGOs” written with Gail B. Nayowith and “Learn Computer Science with Swift.” His most recent apps are “CyberContinuity,” a free app to learn about your vulnerabilities and “The Nonprofit Risk App,” a companion to the book.

Keep Burlington Telecom Local supporter holding sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The future of the City of Burlington’s municipally owned internet and telephone utility remains uncertain after two parties failed to reach an agreement on a collaborative purchasing and operations effort.

  Jonathan Coulton is a singer-songwriter, fan-cruise operator, public radio one-man-house-band, and internet personality -- if in fact that is still a thing. In 2005 the Yale educated computer programmer, pledged to release one song per week for a year to prove to himself that he could produce creative output to a deadline and to see whether a professional artist could use the Internet and Creative Commons to support himself. A hair more than a decade -- and a good many musical adventures -- later, Coulton is releasing a new full-length album, Solid State, tomorrow on SuperEgo records.

SuperEgo records is Aimee Mann’s label, and Jonathan Coulton is opening for her on tour - in support of the Solid State release and that of her new album, Mental Illness.  When the tour was at The Egg in Albany, NY earlier this week, Coulton came by the studio to talk about the concept album, its companion graphic novel (written by Matt Fraction and drawn by Albert Monteys), NPR’s Ask Me Another, and The Spongebob Musical.

corporateinsight.com

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss the ins and outs of dealing with cyber continuity including cyber security and cyber continuity.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer and author. His most recent app is Utility Smart (in the App Store); recent books are "iPad for Seniors for Dummies" (Wiley), and "Exploring Swift Playgrounds"(Apress).  

John Simpson is the former chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, where he helped take the dictionary online.

His new book, The Word Detective: Searching for the Meaning of It All at the Oxford English Dictionary, is an intensely personal memoir and a joyful celebration of English, he weaves a story of how words come into being (and sometimes disappear), how culture shapes the language we use, and how technology has transformed not only the way we speak and write but also how words are made.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss the ins and outs of writing code. Is it as difficult as it sounds?

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. His most recent books are “Learn Apple HomeKit on iOS” and “iPad for Seniors for Dummies.”

Current projects include Utility Smart to manage use of utility resources (with Curt Gervich at SUNY Plattsburgh Risk Management for Nonprofits).

Visit the Congressional App Challenge website.

  There's a lot of interest in teaching people how to write code. This interest encompasses lots of issues including increasing diversity among coders as well as moving beyond the business-oriented world of coding to other worlds such as arts and sciences. Are coding languages becoming just another way of communicating? We'll talk about those issues.

There are several avenues of exploration and development to talk about, and the diversity and organization (or lack thereof) in the development communities mean that there are lots of choices to make.

And, not to be left out, is this all about sixth-graders? Is there any hope for older folks (including many of the folk who are coding and developing the vast amount of software that we all rely on every day).

And what does it mean when people say that millennials are the first digital native generation?

Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler, joins us. 

  We used to say "seeing is believing"; now googling is believing. With 24/7 access to nearly all of the world's information at our fingertips, we no longer trek to the library or the encyclopedia shelf in search of answers.

While a wealth of literature has been devoted to life with the Internet, The Internet of Us: Knowing More and Understanding Less in the Age of Big Data by Michael Patrick Lynch is the first book to take a look at the deep philosophicalimplications of this seismic shift have not been properly explored until now.

  For the past three years, Jon Ronson has travelled the world meeting recipients of high-profile public shamings. The shamed are people like us - people who, say, made a joke on social media that came out badly, or made a mistake at work. Once their transgression is revealed, collective outrage circles with the force of a hurricane and the next thing they know they're being torn apart by an angry mob, jeered at, demonized, sometimes even fired from their job.

Jon Ronson's book, So You've Been Publicly Shamed is now out in paperback.

Sean MacEntee/Flickr

Lt. Governor Kathy Hochul Friday announced a new $1 billion public-private partnership to bring high-speed broadband Internet service with at least 100 megabytes per second of service by 2018.

Sean MacEntee/Flickr

New York's attorney general has asked three major Internet providers to validate claims that customers are getting the access speed promised, especially for premium services.

  The Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College is hosting its eighth annual international conference from Thursday, October 15 to Friday, October 16 on Bard’s Annandale-on-Hudson campus.

The two-day conference, “Why Privacy Matters,” asks: What do we lose when we lose our privacy? Reading on Kindles, searching Google, and using cell phones leave a data trail of intimate details. Governments and businesses track our comings, goings, and doings. The conference will include many knowledgeable speakers on the subject including (via satellite) NSA whistleblower, Edward Snowden. 

Here are some questions to be answered: Why do we willfully participate in the loss of our privacy? How is it that we rarely register its loss? Do we simply value privacy less? It is time to ask why privacy matters? How can a right to privacy and a meaningful private life exist today?

We are joined by Roger Berkowitz and David Brin.

Roger Berkowitz is Academic Director of the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College and Associate Professor of Politics, Philosophy, and Human Rights.

David Brin is an American scientist and award-winning author of science fiction. He has served as visiting scholar at NASA in Exobiology.

  Music journalist Stephen Witt joins us this morning to tell us the story of how piracy took down the music industry. His new book is How Music Got Free.

Witt introduces us to the greatest pirate in history that no one has ever heard of, the most powerful executive in the music business, a revolutionary invention and an illegal website four times the size of the iTunes Music Store.

Even today, how music should be paid for (if at all) is under constant debate, and streaming services like Spotify, Pandora, and now Tidal are continually jockeying for a place in the music consumer market.

  According to our next guest, there is the internet we know and may not completely trust and then there's a part of the Internet most people don’t know about and should be really wary of.

It is part of the internet that is encrypted and hidden and an underworld home to pornography, black markets, trolls, criminals and extremists.

Jamie Bartlett’s new book, The Dark Net, brings us deep into this world. Bartlett is the director of the Center for the Analysis of Social Media at the think tank Demos. Before joining Demos, he was a research associate at the international humanitarian agency Islamic Relief.

BIFF - The Paper Trail

May 28, 2015

  The Paper Trail is screening at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, MA as part of the Berkshire International Film Festival on Sunday, May 3st at 1:30pm.

The documentary is about writers and people in the literary world talking about what they do, how they do it, what it means to them - and the future of writing and publishing. The talking-head style doc features luminaries and authors who are just starting out.

We are joined by the film’s director, Kelly Carty, and the co-director,  writer, and producer, Jonathan Bee.

Just about everyone is online these days. Many, many of us have a website, a Facebook account, or Twitter. But establishing an online presence isn’t simply a matter of turning on the computer and firing up a web browser. Cliff Rohde of GoatCloud Communications is here to answer your questions about establishing a presence online.

  For many of us, it’s an important part of everyday life, but several localities in the listening area can’t get high-speed internet.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Chris Gibson tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that we are making progress. 

  The Innovators is Walter Isaacson’s revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens.

What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail?

  Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, is here with a 10-point list of what to do and look for when creating a website – particularly a non-profit website.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says regulators will investigate what caused Time Warner Cable's nationwide Internet outage as the state reviews the company's merger with Comcast Corp.

Cuomo says Wednesday that dependable Internet service is "vital" and that providers have a responsibility to deliver reliable service. He says he has directed the state's Department of Public Service to review the outage as part of its examination of the merger.

Rep. Peter Welch
photo provided

  Who gets to decide the rules of the internet?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch and WAMC’s Alan Chartock discuss net neutrality.

Sean MacEntee/Flickr

The telecommunications company VTel is rolling out a statewide high-speed communications network that will serve sections of rural Vermont.

WAMC/Pat Bradley

Vermont U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy, chair of the Judiciary Committee, held a field hearing in Burlington this morning to take testimony on rules the Federal Communications Commission is considering that some say threaten an open internet.

4/24/14 Panel

Apr 24, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
Net Neutrality
Georgia Guns
Exercise-related fatigue
Face recognition
TU Stories

Jesse Feiler - WiFi

Aug 22, 2013

    

  This morning we will discuss the mysteries of wi-fi. Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, says there is new technology out there (specifically the new 802.11ac standard from the Wi-Fi Alliance and Quip) – changing where and when we can get on line.

    Ask our tech guru, Jesse Feiler, what he wants to talk about this morning and he will tell you – Intimate Objects. Our job is to find out what they are and what they are not. Jesse is here to provide answers to both questions.

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