family

  This segment begins with audio from an episode of the 1980s television series, Fame. In the clip, Carol Burnett performs with the eldest of her three daughters, Carrie.  Carrie was a series regular and Carol joined the program as a guest star.

In 2002 - at the age of 38 - Carrie died of cancer. 

The new book, Carrie and Me: A Mother-Daughter Love Story is Carol Burnett’s poignant tribute to her late daughter and a funny and moving memoir about mothering an extraordinary young woman through the struggles and triumphs of her life. Sharing her personal diary entries, photographs, and correspondence, Carol traces the journey she and Carrie took through some of life’s toughest challenges.

  We welcome physician and a behavioral scientist, Dr. Peter Ubel, to the show and speak with him about his book, Critical Decisions: How You and Your Doctor Can Make the Right Medical Choices Together.

  As we mentioned earlier, Stéphane Denève will be conducting a Bernstein Extravaganza tomorrow night here at SPAC. And Jamie Bernstein will take part in a tribute to her father, Leonard Bernstein, which will feature members of the New York City Ballet.

The program will include the composer’s “Suite” from “Fancy Free,” and “Something’s Coming” and “Symphonic Dances” from “West Side Story.”

Jamie Bernstein frequently works with symphonies as a narrator, and she helped develop a school concert program for the Philadelphia Orchestra. Collaborating with Michael Barrett, who worked as an assistant conductor with Leonard Bernstein, she developed a program about her father’s music. 

    Kristine Barnett’s son Jacob has an IQ higher than Einstein’s, a photographic memory, and he taught himself calculus in two weeks.

But the story of Kristine’s journey with Jake is all the more remarkable because his extraordinary mind was almost lost to autism.

  Without mantras or manifestos, 29 writers serve up sharp, sweet, and candid memories; salty irreverence; and delicious original recipes. Food is so much more than what we eat. The Cassoulet Saved Our Marriage is an anthology of original essays about how we learn (and relearn) to eat, and how pivotal food is beyond the table.

We speak about the book with one of its editors, Lisa Catherine Harper.

    At loose ends with her daughter leaving home and her husband on the road, Sue Halpern decided to give herself and Pransky, her under-occupied Lab mix, a new lease on life by getting the two of them certified as a therapy dog team.

She writes about the experience in her book, A Dog Walks Into a Nursing Home: Lessons in the Good Life from an Unlikely Teacher.

  Scott Taylor Smith, a venture capitalist and lawyer, had plentiful resources, and yet after his mother died, he made a series of agonizing and costly mistakes in squaring away her affairs. He could find countless books that dealt with caring for the dying and the emotional fallout of death, but very few that dealt with the logistics.In the aftermath of his mother’s death, Smith decided to write the book he wished he’d had.

    To Anne Serling, the imposing figure the public saw hosting The Twilight Zone each week, intoning cautionary observations about fate, chance, and humanity, was not the father she knew. Her fun-loving dad, Rod Serling, would play on the floor with the dogs, had nicknames for everyone in the family.

After his unexpected death at 50, Anne, just 20, was left stunned. Gradually, she found solace for her grief by talking to his friends, poring over old correspondence, and recording her childhood memories.

Now she shares personal photos, eloquent, revealing letters, and beautifully rendered scenes of his childhood, war years, and their family's time together. Her new book is: As I Knew Him: My Dad, Rod Serling.

6/17/13 - Panel

Jun 17, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC's President and Political Observer, Alan Chartock and WAMC News Director, Ian Pickus. Joe Donahue moderates.

Topics include:
New Obama Poll
Apple Requests
Composting in NYC
Media Conflicts
Bullying Siblings

Listener Essay - The Altar

Jun 14, 2013

    Lori Maki is an aspiring writer, passionate gardener, personal mentor, and an adoring Nana to four amazing grandkids.

She works as a writer and graphic designer for The Sage Colleges in Troy, New York. She lives in Brunswick New York with her husband Tim and their black lab puppy, Pepper.

    The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York is in the midst of their countdown to the public opening of the Roosevelt Library's new permanent museum exhibits on June 30th.

Michael Thompson

May 14, 2013

    Berkshire Country Day School and the Berkshires Hills Regional School District present an evening with Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. at 7 pm on Wednesday May 15th at Berkshire Country Day School.

In his work, Dr. Thompson has explored the emotional lives of boys, friendships and social cruelty in childhood, the impact of summer camp experiences on child development, the tensions that arise in the parent-teacher relationships, and psychological aspects of school leadership. His latest book Homesick and Happy: How Time Away From Parents Can Help a Child Grow.

    The Friday before Mother’s Day in 2011, we had Dave Isay on to talk about the book, Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps. As many of you know, StoryCorps is an oral history project designed to document the fascinating lives or normal people. That Spring, Sarah LaDuke's  Mom - Carolyn - turned 70 and retired, so she copied the StoryCorps model (they encourage everyone to do so) and we aired some of her recorded conversation with her mom.

Since that conversation, Carolyn LaDuke has been through a lot. She survived a heart attack in October of 2011 and was diagnosed - for the second time - with breast cancer in late September of 2012. She has recently finished two extremely trying rounds of chemotherapy and should begin radiation soon. This Friday before Mother’s Day - today - we wanted to share a new interview with Sarah's Mom.

    NY Times best-selling author and lifestyle expert Bruce Littlefield’s latest book is his most personal to date. In Moving In: Tales of an Unlicensed Marriage, he takes readers on a wild and often hysterical ride through the first year spent fixing up a historic old house with partner (and unwitting handyman) Scott Stewart, one of Manhattan’s top real estate brokers.

"Flora" by Gail Godwin

May 8, 2013

    Ten-year-old Helen and her summer guardian, Flora, are isolated together in Helen's decaying family house while her father is doing secret war work in Oak Ridge during the final months of World War II. At three Helen lost her mother and the beloved grandmother who raised her has just died.A fiercely imaginative child, Helen is desperate to keep her house intact with all its ghosts and stories. Flora, her late mother's twenty-two-year old first cousin, who cries at the drop of a hat, is ardently determined to do her best for Helen. Their relationship and its fallout, played against a backdrop of a lost America will haunt Helen for the rest of her life.

Listener Essay - Double Graduation

May 6, 2013

  Sharing the spotlight can be difficult, especially when it’s with your sibling. We hear these stories all the time on TV, whether it’s Serena versus Venus Williams or John and Jim Harbaugh coaching against each other in the Super Bowl.

Essayist Leighann Camarero tells us about the personal connection she has with these competitive siblings when it comes to mom and dad having to choose who to support.

    In 1954, in a remote mountain village in South America, a little girl was abducted. She was four years old. Marina Chapman was stolen from her housing estate and then abandoned deep in the Colombian jungle. That she survived is a miracle. Two days later, half-drugged, terrified, and starving, she came upon a troop of capuchin monkeys. Acting entirely on instinct, she tried to do what they did: she ate what they ate and copied their actions, and little by little, learned to fend for herself.

Listener Essay - A Man of Letters

Apr 17, 2013

  This Listener Essay by Barbara Redfield is entitled "A Man of Letters."

    Elizabeth Graver’s new novel, The End of the Point , is set in a summer community on Buzzard’s Bay from 1942 to 1999 and traces one family’s journey through the latter half of the 20th Century.

It examines the legacy of family and place and explores what we’re born into and what we pass down.

Anne Lamott

Apr 12, 2013

    Renowned author Anne Lamott, whose latest work of non-fiction is Help, Thanks, Wow: The Three Essential Prayers is in town this morning to speak at Hudson Valley Community College in Troy at 11 AM. We are thrilled she stopped by here first.

Lamott uses humor to get her messages across about motherhood, loss, spirituality and alcoholism in her novels and non-fiction. Among her works are Operating Instructions, Hard Laughter, Rosie, and Some Assembly Required: A Journal of My Son’s First Son – which is just out in paperback.

    Mary Williams was born to Black Panther parents during the heart of the Black Power movement in Oakland, Calif., in the 1970s. She was just a toddler when her father went to San Quentin prison.

Her mother, struggled to support the family on her own, turning to alcohol, as her oldest sister turned to crack and prostitution. But when Williams was sent to spend the summer at a camp run by Jane Fonda, her life began to change.

Over the course of several summers, Fonda and Williams grew close, and eventually, the Hollywood star invited Williams, at age 16, to come live with her in Santa Monica. This was the beginning of a journey, which she chronicles in her new memoir, The Lost Daughter.

Joan Marcus

    Manhattan Theatre Club was founded in 1970 and has grown in four decades from a prolific Off-Off Broadway showcase into one of the country’s most acclaimed theatre organizations. They are currently producing the world premiere of Liz Flahive’s play, The Madrid. The production is directed by two time Obie award winner, Leigh Silverman and is running through May 5th.

Edie Falco stars as Martha, a kindergarten teacher with a life many would want: a loving husband and a devoted daughter. But when she leaves it all behind, it's up to her daughter Sarah to pick up the pieces. It’s a darkly funny play, certain to evoke a cavalcade of feelings anyone lucky enough to attend.

The daughter, Sarah, is played by Phoebe Strole. Phoebe was last seen in the New York City premiere of Dan LeFranc's The Big Meal at Playwrights Horizons. Other theater credits include the original cast of Spring Awakening, The Metal Children at Vineyard, and F2M at New York Stage & Film.

    For years, people have been asking Ezekiel “Zeke” Emanuel, the brash, outspoken, and fiercely loyal eldest brother in the Emanuel clan, the same question: What did your mom put in the cereal? Middle brother Rahm is the mayor of Chicago, erstwhile White House chief of staff, and one of the most colorful figures in American politics. Youngest brother Ari is a Hollywood super-agent. And Zeke himself is one of the world’s leading bioethicists and oncologists, and a former special advisor for health policy in the Obama administration.

In the new memoir, Brothers Emanuel: A Memoir of an American Family, Zeke tells his family's story.

  According to our next guest, in their efforts to juggle schoolwork and extracurricular activities, family life and social lives, friends, as well as relationships online and the real world, many girls begin to lose sight of who they really are, and instead work overtime to please their friends, parents, teachers, and others.

In her new book, The Myth of the Perfect Girl, Ana Hamoyoun presents advice to empower both parents and girls themselves to discover what true success and happiness means to them — and how to work to achieve it.

In 1982 years ago, Sue Grafton introduced us to Kinsey Millhone - the main character in her best-selling alphabet mystery series. In her new book, Kinsey and Me: Stories Grafton gives readers stories that reveal Kinsey’s origins and Sue’s past.

Will Schwalbe - The End of Your Life Book Club

Jan 8, 2013

When Will Schwalbe’s mother was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer life for her family and friends didn’t come to a stop, but morphed into something even more beautiful. Her compassion towards others never faltered, her grown children learned more about themselves and her, and a bond solidified as Will and his mother unconsciously formed The End of Your Life Book Club.

In the spring of 2009, John Schwartz got a distress call from his wife. His 13-year old son, Joe, was on his way to the hospital after a failed suicide attempt.

Joe, a socially awkward but smart boy, had finally mustered the courage to come out as gay to his classmates who responded with discomfort and dismay. Hours later, he took dozens of Benadryl capsules with the intention of killing himself.

This listener essay is by Mel Quinlan.

Kathy Curto is a published writing living in Cold Spring with her husband, their four children and one big dog. 

We welcome Zach Wahls and speak with him about his book, My Two Moms: Lessons of Love, Strength, and What Makes a Family .

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