crime

At the age of nine, Issac J. Bailey saw his hero, his eldest brother, taken away in handcuffs, not to return from prison for thirty-two years. Bailey tells the story of their relationship and of his experience living in a family suffering from guilt and shame in his book, "My Brother Moochie: Regaining Dignity in the Midst of Crime, Poverty, and Racism in the American South." Drawing on sociological research as well as his expertise as a journalist, he seeks to answer the crucial question of why Moochie and many other young black men, including half of the ten boys in his own family, end up in the criminal justice system.

What role do poverty, race, and faith play? What effect does living in the South, in the Bible Belt, have? And why is their experience understood as an acceptable trope for black men, while white people who commit crimes are never seen in this generalized way?

Issac J. Bailey was born in St. Stephen, South Carolina, and holds a degree in psychology from Davidson College in North Carolina. Having trained at the prestigious Poynter Institute for journalists in St. Petersburg, Florida, he has been a professional journalist for twenty years. He has taught applied ethics at Coastal Carolina University and, as a Nieman Fellow at Harvard, has taught journalism at Harvard Summer School.

The Albany Police Department is investigating another shooting death as a rash in violent crime continues.

The Albany Police Department is investigating two seperate shooting incidents that occurred early Sunday morning.

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A woman who was allegedly shoplifting from an Albany County Walmart is facing charges after striking a police officer with her vehicle.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

Police are asking the public for information after a man was killed and another injured in Albany early Saturday.

Alisa Roth is a former staff reporter for Marketplace and frequent contributor to various NPR programs. A Soros Justice Fellow, her work has also appeared in the New York Review of Books and New York Times.

America has made mental illness a crime. Jails in New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago each house more people with mental illnesses than any hospital. As many as half of all people in America's jails and prisons have a psychiatric disorder. One in four fatal police shootings involves a person with such disorders.

In "Insane: America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness," Roth goes deep inside the criminal justice system to show how and why it has become a warehouse where inmates are denied proper treatment, abused, and punished in ways that make them sicker.

Mary Cummings is a writer and historian. She has been awarded by the New York Press Association for her obituary of Joseph Heller and a “Best In-Depth Reporting” Award for “Troubled Waters,” a series on Long 

Island’s threatened groundwater supply. She has written for The New York Times, Newsday, Time Out New York, and more, and was the arts editor and principal feature writer at The Southampton Press.

Her new book is "Saving Sin City: William Travers Jerome, Stanford White, and the Original Crime of the Century."

When Stanford White, one of the most famous architects of the era, whose mark on New York City is second to none, was murdered by Harry K. Thaw in 1906, his death become known as “The Crime of the Century.” But there were other players in this love triangle gone wrong that would play a part in the incredible story of White’s murderer.

When a stolen car is recovered on the Gulf Coast of Florida, it sets off a search for a missing woman, local motel owner Sabine Musil-Buehler. Three men are named persons of interest: her husband, her boyfriend, and the man who stole the car. The residents of Anna Maria Island, with few facts to fuel their speculation, begin to fear the worst. Then, with the days passing quickly, her motel is set on fire, her boyfriend flees the county, and detectives begin digging on the beach.

Cutter Wood was a guest at Musil-Buehler’s motel as the search for the missing woman gained momentum, and he found himself drawn steadily deeper into the case. His book is "Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime."

Leslie Jamison is the author of the essay collection "The Empathy Exams," a New York Times bestseller, and the novel "The Gin Closet," a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Her work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Harper's, and the Oxford American, among others, and she is a columnist for the New York Times Book Review. She teaches at Columbia University.

Leslie Jamison's new book "The Recovering" turns our understanding of the traditional addiction narrative on its head, demonstrating that the story of recovery can be every bit as electrifying as the train wreck itself. Jamison excavates the stories we tell about addiction, both her own and others' -- and examines what we want these stories to do and what happens when they fail us.

Gilbert King is the author of "Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America," which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2013. He has written about Supreme Court history and the death penalty for the New York Times and the Washington Post, and is a featured contributor to Smithsonian magazine and The Marshall Project.

His new book, "Beneath a Ruthless Sun" tells a powerful, page-turning story rooted in the fears that rippled through the South as integration began to take hold, sparking a surge of virulent racism that savaged the vulnerable, debased the powerful, and roils our own times still.

Joe Pickett, the Wyoming game warden and unassuming lawman who graces C.J. Box’s #1 New York Times bestselling series of western crime novels, returns in a riveting eighteenth installment, "The Disappeared."

Having won every major prize in the crime fiction genre, including the Edgar, Anthony, Macavity, Gumshoe, and Barry awards, and with over ten million copies of his novels sold in the U.S. alone, C.J. Box is an acknowledged master at honing unforgettable characters and un-put-downable plots.

Jake Bernstein was a senior reporter on the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists team that broke the Panama Papers story. In 2017, the project won the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting. Bernstein earned his first Pulitzer Prize in 2011 for National Reporting, for coverage of the financial crisis.

In "Secrecy World," Bernstein explores this shadow economy and how it evolved, drawing on millions of leaked documents from the files of the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca ― a trove now known as the Panama Papers ― as well as other journalistic and government investigations. Bernstein shows how shell companies operate, how they allow the super-wealthy and celebrities to escape taxes, and how they provide cover for illicit activities on a massive scale by crime bosses and corrupt politicians across the globe.

Edward Mero
Albany County District Attorney's Office

A former city of Albany employee has been found guilty of killing two 23-year-old women.

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A 31-year-old man has pleaded guilty to fatally shooting another man and wounding three bystanders inside a crowded Albany nightclub last fall.

Earlier this year, it was announced that Schenectady County had the highest per capita crime rate in New York. Now, officials are looking to curb that statistic with a new county-wide policing strategy.

Burlington Police car
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Police in Burlington, Vermont, say a man has been arrested after he pulled a large knife during a fight in City Hall Park.

The embattled mayor of a Saratoga County village has resigned.

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The former treasurer of a volunteer fire company has been sentenced to 30 days in jail and ordered to pay $58,000 in restitution for embezzlement.

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich’s new book, The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir, is inspired by her time at a law firm in Louisiana working on the retrial defense of death-row convicted murderer and child molester Ricky Langley. She shows how ''the law is more personal than we would like to believe and the truth more complicated, and powerful, than we could ever imagine.''

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A suspect has been charged with killing a woman and young child in Glens Falls early Friday.

Thousands of pregnant women pass through our nation’s jails every year. What happens to them as they carry their pregnancies in a space of punishment? In this time when the public safety net is frayed, incarceration has become a central and racialized strategy for managing the poor.

In her book Jailcare, Carolyn Sufrin explores how jail has, paradoxically, become a place where women can find care. Carolyn Sufrin is a medical anthropologist and an obstetrician-gynecologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

This post has been updated

A man is dead and a police officer is recovering from a gunshot wound after an incident Friday night in the Schenectady County town of Glenville.

In the 1970s, the United States had an incarceration rate comparable to those of other liberal democracies-and that rate had held steady for over 100 years. Yet today, though the US is home to only about 5 percent of the world's population, we hold nearly one quarter of its prisoners. Mass incarceration is now widely considered one of the biggest social and political crises of our age. How did we get to this point?

Locked In is a revelatory investigation into the root causes of mass incarceration by one of the most exciting scholars in the country. Having spent fifteen years studying the data on imprisonment, John Pfaff takes apart the reigning consensus created by Michelle Alexander and other reformers, revealing that the most widely accepted explanations-the failed War on Drugs, draconian sentencing laws, an increasing reliance on private prisons-tell us much less than we think.

  Nineteenth-century New York City was one of the most magnificent cities in the world, but also one of the most deadly. Without any real law enforcement for almost 200 years, the city was a lawless place where the crime rate was triple what it is today and the murder rate was five or six times as high. The staggering amount of crime threatened to topple a city that was experiencing meteoric growth and striving to become one of the most spectacular in America.

In Law & Disorder: The Chaotic Birth of the NYPD, award-winning historian Bruce Chadwick examines how rampant violence led to the founding of the first professional police force in New York City. 

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Albany police are currently seeking more information about a shooting that occurred early Sunday.

Authorities in Mississippi say a suspect is in custody after eight people were killed in a shooting, including a sheriff's deputy.

Mississippi Bureau of Investigation spokesman Warren Strain said the shootings occurred at three separate homes Saturday night in rural Lincoln County. Two of the homes are in Brookhaven and one is in Bogue Chitto. The area is about 68 miles (109 kilometers) south of Jackson, the capital.

Strain said investigators were gathering evidence at all three locations.

In thriller writer Lisa Scottoline’s latest novel, One Perfect Lie, we meet Chris Brennan, although that’s not really his name. He’s the new teacher and assistant baseball coach at Central Valley High. Among his secrets: Six days from now, there’s going to be a bombing. But what does Chris want from the baseball players and families?  

Unwarranted: Policing Without Permission by Barry Friedman tells the stories of ordinary people whose lives were torn apart by policing -- by the methods of cops on the beat and those of the FBI and NSA.

Driven by technology, policing has changed dramatically. Once, cops sought out bad guys; today, increasingly militarized forces conduct wide surveillance of all of us.

The New York State Parole Board Friday denied parole for Judith Clark, the getaway driver in the failed 1981 Rockland County Brinks armored car robbery that left three law enforcement officers dead.

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Police say a 27-year-old man has been fatally shot inside a car in Albany.

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