Academic Minute

#1456: "BRAINS!"

Aug 16, 2018

Just about any teacher will tell you that dealing with teenagers for a living can range from rewarding to nightmarish. But don’t blame or credit the child…it’s all on the child’s brain.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll learn how the constantly changing brain of teenagers makes them who they are…eventually.

We’ll hear the story of a Massachusetts woman whose brain underwent changes due to a childhood trauma, the care that was needed to help get her life back…and we’ll spend an academic minute finding out just who is likely to develop PTSD.

There are parts of US history that many of us are not proud of…and slavery has got to be either on or very near the top of that list. And the history of slavery in the new world is entwined with another huge part of early colonial life: Christianity.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll open up history class and learn about the paradoxes and justifications of Christian slavery in America.

We’ve been hearing about the problem of rising student debt for so long that some graduates are using it as a badge of honor. A lot of that debt is generated by for-profit colleges, who continue to attract a growing number of students. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about the rise of for profit colleges and how inequality, both financial and academic, is fueling that rise.

We’ll also spend an academic minute learning how to check our facts because, apparently, we really stink at it.

Gloria Rangel

Parents who send their children to a neighborhood school in a small California city were devastated over the announcement that the school will be shut down. Then, they started taking action.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll tell you about the fight to save Fair Oaks Elementary School in Redwood City, California.

Then we’ll meet a high school English teacher who has published a series of young adult fiction book with the help of some unusual editors…the student in his creative writing class. And we’ll spend an academic minute at recess.

National History Day

Some of the brightest students from across the country met just outside Washington DC last month for the finals of the National History Day Contest, and there was a rare two-time winner.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to that exceptional student and learn all about National History Day.

We’ll also get an update on what some congressional Democrats are doing in the wake of the Supreme Court’s Janus decision on public sector unions. And if you don’t want to fall on your face, then spend an academic minute out on the dance floor.

Teachers need to master quite a few disciplines to get through the school year. Communication, innovation, empathy and, importantly…ethics. Educators come across ethical questions almost every day…and dealing with them has a profound effect on students…and themselves.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk educational ethics.

We’ll also spend an academic minute seeing how immigration affects education.

Bob Barrett

Students and teachers looking back on this school year will remember the lessons that were taught and learned, the memories of friendships made and reinforced, and in some places, the time teachers walked off the job for better pay and working conditions. And it worked.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll have a conversation with the President of the National Education Association about those job actions, and the future of the union.

The Global Corner

As much as we might all like to be world travelers, most young students usually stay pretty close to home. But a small group of teachers in Florida are doing their part to bring the world to these students.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll introduce you to The Global Corner, and learn how they hope to broaden the world view of young students.

We’ll also hear about the latest edition of a massive book on family health…and spend an academic minute trying to ignore the facts and follow your instincts.

1968 was one of the most turbulent years in modern American history, filled with stories of anti-war protests, civil rights demonstrations and assassinations. June 5 marked 50 years since Robert Kennedy became one of those leaders who was gunned down.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear from the author of a book about Kennedy, and how he grew to become a liberal icon.

We’ll also spend an academic minute with a different view of mental health.

Bob Barrett

It may be hyperbole to say that school shootings have become a way of life in the US…but it seems like they are no longer shocking. They certainly have become more frequent over the past few years. And students have become much more vocal about demanding something be done.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll take you to a session held in Los Angeles during the Education Writers Association’s National Seminar, where four students from around the country spoke out about their experiences with school violence.

Last week we told you how more and more women are studying STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. Right now, let’s focus on the “S”. Specifically the science of astronomy, where women have been instrumental since the 19th century.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about the remarkable scientists who helped us understand our place among the stars.

#1443: "Women In STEM"

May 17, 2018
women in stem
wikimedia commons

There has been a big push in schools across the country to emphasize STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. And girls are being encouraged to enter these fields more than ever. But what happens when those girls become women?

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, a look at the challenges women face working in the STEM fields. We’ll also learn about a different kind of STEM occupation…sound engineering, go back in time to take another look at time travel, and spend an academic minute with the shrinking number of international adoptions.

It seems like every day there are more and more outlets available to get news and information. Web sites, podcasts, social media, more web sites are pumping out news stories every hour…many of which have, shall we say, dubious information.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about the cacophony of information that’s available…and how to tell the true, from the not so much.

We’ll also learn about a college in Vermont that is offering its on-line students a big break in tuition… and we’ll spend an Academic Minute exploring the connection between memory and sleep.

How much do you know about money? It’s an important question because a new survey shows that the majority of students in the US get their financial education at home…and that education is lacking.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about that survey, and how one high school economics teacher is working to increase her students’ financial literacy.

We’ll also learn about how an event in outer space indirectly opened the door to college to millions of American women, and we’ll spend an Academic Minute feeling loved.

Sesame Place dot com

Last year, Sesame Street was in the news for introducing a Muppet character with autism. Now, a theme park based on the show has been designated a certified autism center.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about the changes this year at Sesame Place.

We’ll also explore how people with autism and other conditions are finding their way into the media, talk to a big time comet hunter, and spend an Academic Minute looking out for asteroids.

Common Core has been the starting point for many a lively, and at times agitated discussion. Next time on The Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to a political science professor whose new book calls it a threat to democracy.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute with another famous boogey man: Frankenstein.

I’m Bob Barrett…that’s this week on The Best of Our Knowledge.

#1435: "One Goal"

Mar 22, 2018

After years of economic decline and racial tension, a city in Maine that has become a popular landing spot for Somali refugees came together a couple of years ago over a very special soccer team…and a very special game.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear author Amy Bass's story of how one team, one coach and one goal united this New England community.

We’re hearing an awful lot about ‘grit’ these days when it comes to education. The popular narrative is if a student has grit and determination, than they will be successful, no matter what racial and financial roadblocks are in their way. A long time educator has her doubts.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about the new book called When Grit Isn’t Enough.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute learning from our mistakes.

For quite some time, the word ‘refugees’ has been met with suspicion and more than a little fear. The 2016 election season and result didn’t help that at all. But there are refugee families trying to assimilate and become more American. Now, a new book details a year in the life of some refugee children as they adjust to their new home.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about that book called “The Newcomers”.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute with children learning English at home…with an accent.

EL Education

Recently there has been talk about returning citizenship and character education to public schools across the country. This has caused some controversy as you might expect. But according to at least one national educator, it really shouldn’t.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, a discussion about character education.

Then we’ll hear from a mental health trauma expert about the aftermath of another school shooting, lighten the mood with some preschoolers talking about their favorite TV character…and spend an Academic Minute looking for the Abominable Snowman.

Humans have been telling stories ever since they could draw pictures on a cave wall. Next time on The Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll explore the long history of the written word, and how telling stories has changed history.

We’ll spend an Academic Minute telling stories through video games.

I’m Bob Barrett…that’s this week on The Best of Our Knowledge.

The man who introduced Alexander Hamilton to a new generation is at it again. After Hamilton, he wrote about George Washington and now he’s taken on the story of another American icon: Ulysses S Grant.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we return to history class and learn about the Civil War hero and 18th President of the United States.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute going way back in history, to when early humans started thinking like humans.

U Albany

A professor was called in to help determine the cause of an outbreak of an extremely rare cancer in New York City. What she found took those scientists halfway around the world.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll from that professor and how she helped solve this puzzle.

We’ll also hear about a partnership between a community college and a computer giant…learn the science behind gene splicing to help cure disease…and spend an Academic Minute looking for a new way to fight Lyme disease.

YouTube

When you think about alternative energy sources, one of the first things that comes to mind is solar energy. It’s not a new concept, and it’s becoming less expensive to set up and run. But industry and transportation still need liquid, chemical fuels. Can science figure out how to do what every green plant on Earth already can: convert sunlight into liquid, energy filled fuel?

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to a scientist who is trying to perfect Artificial Photosynthesis.

How much are teachers valued in the US? There are a lot of politicians, media outlets and education reformers who can’t say enough bad things about teachers and teachers unions. But every school day kids around the country sit down in front of teachers dedicated to their jobs.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to the author of a new book that explores, and debunks, the 19 biggest myths about teachers, unions and public education.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute building a better brain…bilingually.

There are some amazing young people with amazing young minds attending schools all over the country and for some reason, they are just plain bad at being students.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to a veteran educator about what it takes to develop the skills that help a student learn how to learn.

Then we’ll meet a refugee family who live in central New York, who are going to school and building a family in a town that makes them feel welcome.

We’ll also spend an Academic Minute with politicians and the media because no one ever talks about that.

You can have the most extensive education the world can offer and money can buy…but sooner or later you’re going to have to learn how to balance a checkbook. So how are states and school systems meeting their responsibility of teaching students basic personal finance skills? One college in Vermont took on that questions and found some answers.

Georgia Barrett

Well  we’re just about ready to put this year to bed, which means it’s time to look back and talk about some of the most interesting people we met over the past 12 months. That’s pretty easy when you do a program with the word “knowledge” in the title. This year was better than most: I got to meet the Fonz!

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll listen again to my conversation with Henry Winkler about how he deals with dyslexia.

Each year in late December, we look back over the past 12 months to find the stories we especially enjoyed telling. This year, we spent a lot of time talking about people with autism. We found out the help that children with autism receive both in and out of school. But school doesn’t last forever, and we found out that once they graduate, those former students can find themselves with little to no help at all.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll look back on our segment about what can happen when a child with autism becomes an adult.

WAMC

Given the size and financial strength of some large college and universities in the US, it came as a bit of a surprise that a small, liberal arts college in western Massachusetts is the first institution in the country to go 100 percent solar.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to the college president who got this project rolling.

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