1990s

In 1991, Thelma & Louise, the story of two outlaw women on the run from their disenchanted lives, was a revelation. Finally, here was a film in which women were, in every sense, behind the wheel. It turned the tables on Hollywood, instantly becoming a classic.

Becky Aikman’s new book "Off the Cliff: How the Making of Thelma & Louise Drove Hollywood to the Edge," offers a rousing behind-the-scenes look at the filmmaking process as well as the vivid personalities behind the creation of a cinematic masterpiece.

Becky Aikman is the author of the memoir "Saturday Night Widows: The Adventures of Six Friends Remaking Their Lives." She was a journalist at Newsday, and her work has also appeared in the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times.

  As a performer, songwriter and producer, Richard Marx’s nearly three-decade-long career has had innumerable highlights. The Chicago native has sold more than 30 million albums worldwide. To this day, he is the only male artist in history to have his first seven singles reach the Top 5 on the Billboard charts.

He will perform at The Colonial in Pittsfield, MA this Friday, presented by The Berkshire Theatre Group.

    The Breakfast Club defined an entire generation of pop culture and included such talent as Molly Ringwald “the princess,” Anthony Michael Hall “the brain,” Emilio Estevez “the jock,” Judd Nelson “the criminal,” and Ally Sheedy “the basket-case.”

It is likely the late John Hughes most-loved film and it's receiving a cinema re-release from Fathom Events tomorrow night and next Tuesday, March 31st. To commemorate the anniversary, we spoke with Kirk Honeycutt about his book, John Hughes: A Life in Film.  

Honeycutt is the former chief film critic for The Hollywood Reporter for many years and subsequent to that, senior film reporter for that publication. Honeycutt is a member of the prestigious Los Angeles Film Critics Association, and is the creator of Honeycutt's Hollywood, a popular film review website.