The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:50 - Congressional Corner
11:10 - Earth Wise

Book Picks lists are here.

You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Tedra Cobb
Tedra Cobb for NY21

Republicans are hoping to hold on to New York’s 21st House district.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Democrat Tedra Cobb wraps up her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Jockey Julie Krone
NYRA

When the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in Saratoga Springs hosts a symposium on women in racing Sunday morning at 10, the first woman ever elected to the Hall of Fame will be there. Legendary jockey Julie Krone is returning to Saratoga to take part in the panel, which also features Hall of Fame trainer Janet Elliott, steeplechase jockey Blythe Miller Davies, and trainer Linda Rice, among others.

8/15/18 Panel

Aug 15, 2018

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Berkshire Eagle Reporter Jenn Smith, former regional administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Judith Enck, and communications consultant Joe Bonilla.

The 413Heart Music & Arts Festival at The Stationery Factory in Dalton, Massachusetts is celebrating its third year bringing an exciting mix of art to the Berkshires. The festival runs this Thursday through Sunday, August 16-19.

Michael Dowling is a Berkshire-based playwright and screenwriter. His play “Tamarack House” is a comedy/drama about five men struggling to stay afloat when they discover the run-down boarding house they call home is suddenly put on the market. There will be a staged reading of the play at The Stationery Factory on Saturday, August 18.

Our pal Johnny Irion has a new solo record entitled “Driving Friend” – he’ll headline the 413Heart Festival on Friday, August 17.

Written by four-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Robert E. Sherwood, “The Petrified Forest” tells the story of a waitress named Gabby Maple; a disillusioned writer named Alan Squier; and a fugitive killer named Duke Mantee as they sweat out a manhunt with a handful of colorful characters in an Arizona diner.

Berkshire Theatre Group presents “The Petrified Forest” on The Fitzpatrick Mainstage in Stockbridge, Massachusetts through August 25th.

The production is directed by Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winner David Auburn and stars David Adkins (Alan Squier), Rebecca Brooksher (Gabby Mable), and Jeremy Davidson (Duke Mantee) – who join us.

  Today's Book Picks come from Matt Tannenbaum from The Bookstore in Lenox.

List:
"Slipper" by Hester Velmans
"Fruit of the Drunken Tree" by Ingrid Rojas Contreras
"The Collected Stories of Machado de Assis"
"The Debatable Land: The Lost World Between Scotland and England" by Graham Robb
"A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety" by Donald Hall
"The Overstory: A Novel" by Richard Powers
"Third Thoughts" by Steven Weinberg

Event: "Charley's Horse" by Judith Shaw - August 17 at 5:30 p.m.

Tedra Cobb
Tedra Cobb for NY21

All politics is local.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tedra Cobb — a Democrat running in New York’s 21st district — continues her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

In 1991, Thelma & Louise, the story of two outlaw women on the run from their disenchanted lives, was a revelation. Finally, here was a film in which women were, in every sense, behind the wheel. It turned the tables on Hollywood, instantly becoming a classic.

Becky Aikman’s new book "Off the Cliff: How the Making of Thelma & Louise Drove Hollywood to the Edge," offers a rousing behind-the-scenes look at the filmmaking process as well as the vivid personalities behind the creation of a cinematic masterpiece.

Becky Aikman is the author of the memoir "Saturday Night Widows: The Adventures of Six Friends Remaking Their Lives." She was a journalist at Newsday, and her work has also appeared in the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times.

8/14/18 Panel

Aug 14, 2018

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain, Political Consultant Libby Post, and Siena College Professor of Economics, Aaron Pacitti.

Roslyn Ruff (Berenice) - THE MEMBER OF THE WEDDING  By Carson McCullers  Directed by Gaye Taylor Upchurch  Williamstown Theatre Festival  August 5 - 19
Carolyn Brown / Williamstown Theatre Festival

Carson McCullers’ “The Member of the Wedding,” directed by Gaye Taylor Upchurch, is running on the Main Stage at The Williamstown Theatre Festival through August 19.

Set in the South on the eve of a family wedding in 1945, housekeeper Berenice Sadie Brown tries to calm the nerves of her 12-year-old charge, Frankie, a tomboy - lonely and uncertain - struggling to feel a part of something.

McCullers novel was published in 1946 and the author adapted the story for the stage where it opened on Broadway in 1950.

Roslyn Ruff plays Berenice Sadie Brown. Ruff’s an accomplished television, film, and stage actress with Broadway credits that include “Romeo and Juliet” with Orlando Bloom and Condola Rashad, and “All the Way” with Bryan Cranston.

Samira Wiley (Pretty Mbane) - DANGEROUS HOUSE  By Jen Silverman  Directed by Saheem Ali  Williamstown Theatre Festival  August 8 - 19
Sarah Sutton / Williamstown Theatre Festival

For its final Nikos Stage production of the 2018 season, The Williamstown Theatre Festival presents “Dangerous House,” a new play by Jen Silverman directed by Saheem Ali.

Set in Cape Town, South Africa during the 2010 World Cup, “Dangerous House” contrasts the celebration of global football against a devastating truth of South African culture when it comes to gender roles and sexuality.

Samira Wiley plays Pretty Mbane. Wiley is an Emmy nominated Actress for her work as Moira on the Hulu series, “The Handmaid’s Tale,” and she played Poussey for four seasons on the Netflix series, “Orange is the New Black.”

Joseph Crespino is the Jimmy Carter Professor of history at Emory University. He is the author of "In Search of Another Country," winner of the 2008 Lillian Smith Book Award from the Southern Regional Council, and "Strom Thurmond's America."

The publication of "Go Set a Watchman" in 2015 forever changed how we think about Atticus Finch. Once seen as a paragon of decency, he was reduced to a small-town racist. How are we to understand this transformation?

In "Atticus Finch," historian Joseph Crespino draws on exclusive sources to reveal how Harper Lee's father provided the central inspiration for each of her books. A lawyer and newspaperman, A. C. Lee was a principled opponent of mob rule, yet he was also a racial paternalist. Harper Lee created the Atticus of Watchman out of the ambivalence she felt toward white southerners like him. But when a militant segregationist movement arose that mocked his values, she revised the character in "To Kill a Mockingbird" to defend her father and to remind the South of its best traditions.

Tedra Cobb
Tedra Cobb for NY21

Will Republican Elise Stefanik win a third term in New York’s 21st House district?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Democratic candidate Tedra Cobb speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Joshua Bell
http://joshuabell.com

With a career spanning more than 30 years as a soloist, chamber musician, recording artist and conductor, Joshua Bell is one of the most celebrated violinists of his era. In addition to being a highly sought after soloist, Bell is the Music Director of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields in 2011, he is the only person to hold this post since Sir Neville Marriner formed the orchestra in 1958.

He will be at SPAC in Saratoga Springs, New York this week for two very special programs with The Philadelphia Orchestra. On Friday, August 17, Yannick Nézet-Séguin will conduct a program featuring Dvořák, Tchaikovsky, and Bell playing a Bruch Violin Concerto.

On Saturday, August 18, Joshua Bell and the orchestra, led by Michael Stern, will play John Corigliano’s Academy Award winning score to the film “The Red Violin” as the film, released in 1998 and directed by François Girard, plays in SPAC’s Amphitheater. Bell was the solo violinist on the soundtrack and was a violinist double in the film.

8/13/18 Panel

Aug 13, 2018

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, former New York State Senator and SUNY New Paltz Communications Professor, Terry Gipson, political consultant Libby Post, and Albany Law School Professor and Director of the Immigration Law Clinic, Sarah Rogerson.

For millennia of human history, the future belonged to the strong. To the parent who could kill the most animals with sticks and to the child who could survive the winter or the epidemic. When the Industrial Revolution came, masters of business efficiency prospered instead, and after that we placed our hope in scientific visionaries. Today, in a clear sign of evolution totally sliding off the rails, our most coveted trait is not strength or productivity or even innovation, but being funny. Yes, funniness.

In the book, "Planet Funny," Ken Jennings explores this brave new comedic world.

Jacomo Bairos
https://www.nu-deco.org/

Based in Miami, Florida, Nu Deco Ensemble is an eclectic chamber orchestra group that through adventurous classical music performances presents various styles of music, art, and media collaborations in both traditional and alternative venues. Working in conjunction with local Miami musicians, composers, DJs, dancers, visual and media artists, Nu Deco Ensemble creates a new hybrid of musical and multi-media experiences.

The Nu Deco Ensemble will perform as part of the SPAC on Stage series in Saratoga Springs on Monday, August 13. Co-Founder and Co-Artistic Director Jacomo Bairos joins us.

Christopher White has written numerous books, including "Skipjack: The Story of America’s Last Sailing Oystermen" and "The Melting World: A Journey Across America’s Vanishing Glaciers." His articles have appeared in Audubon, The Baltimore Sun, The New Mexican, National Geographic, and Exploration.

In his new book, "The Last Lobster: Boom or Bust for Maine's Greatest Fishery?" he follows three lobster captains: Frank, Jason, and Julie (one the few female skippers in Maine), as they haul and set thousands of traps.

For the past five years, the lobster population along the coast of Maine has boomed, resulting in a lobster harvest six times the size of the record catch from the 1980s an event unheard of in fisheries. In a detective story, scientists and fishermen explore various theories for the glut. Leading contenders are a sudden lack of predators and a recent wedge of warming waters, which may disrupt the reproductive cycle, a consequence of climate change. Unexpectedly, boom may turn to bust, as the captains must fight a warming ocean, volatile prices, and rough weather to keep their livelihood afloat.

Voters in New York’s Hudson Valley have a chance to decide the future of the House.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Democratic candidate Antonio Delgado of the 19th district wraps up his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

What happened in 1983 to make the Soviet Union so afraid of a potential nuclear strike from the United States that they sent mobile intercontinental ballistic missiles into the field, placing them on a three-minute alert?

In his book, "The Brink: President Reagan and the Nuclear War Scare of 1983," Marc Ambinder explains the anxious period between the United States and the Soviet Union from 1982 to 1984, with the “Able Archer ’83” war game as the fulcrum of the tension. With astonishing and clarifying new details, he recounts the scary series of the close encounters that tested the limits of ordinary humans and powerful leaders alike. Ambinder explains how political leadership ultimately triumphed over misunderstandings, helping the two countries maintain a fragile peace.

8/10/18 Panel

Aug 10, 2018

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti, and Albany County District Attorney David Soares.

Kate Davies MA, DPhil, has worked on environmental and social issues for her entire career.

We are living in an era of unprecedented crisis, resulting in widespread feelings of fear, despair, and grief. Now, more than ever, maintaining hope for the future is a monumental task. In Davies' new book, "Intrinsic Hope: Living Courageously in Troubled Times," she offers an antidote to these feelings and shows how conventional ideas of hope are rooted in the belief that life will conform to our wishes and how this leads to disappointment, despair, and a dismal view of the future. As an alternative, she offers 'intrinsic hope,' a powerful, liberating, and positive approach to life based on having a deep trust in whatever happens.

Between the world wars no sport was more popular or more dangerous than airplane racing. Thousands of fans flocked to multi‑day events, and cities vied with one another to host them. The pilots themselves were hailed as dashing heroes who cheerfully stared death in the face. Well, the men were hailed. Female pilots were more often ridiculed than praised for what the press portrayed as silly efforts to horn in on a manly, and deadly, pursuit. Keith O'Brien's book, "Fly Girls," recounts how a cadre of women banded together to break the original glass ceiling: the entrenched prejudice that conspired to keep them out of the sky.

Keith O'Brien is an award-winning journalist, a former reporter for the Boston Globe, a regular contributor to National Public Radio and Politico, and a critically acclaimed author of books about dreams, Americana, and where the two meet. He has written for the New York Times Magazine and reported stories for This American Life. He was a 2017 finalist for the PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing.

Allen Gannett is the founder and CEO of TrackMaven, a software analytics firm whose clients have included Microsoft, Marriott, Saks Fifth Avenue, Home Depot, Aetna, Honda, and GE. He has been on the “30 Under 30” lists for both Inc. and Forbes.

In his book, "The Creative Curve," he overturns the mythology around creative genius, and reveals the science and secrets behind achieving breakout commercial success in any field.

We have been spoon-fed the notion that creativity is the province of genius; of those favored, brilliant few whose moments of insight arrive in unpredictable flashes of divine inspiration. And if we are not a genius, we might as well pack it in and give up. Either we have that gift, or we don’t. But Allen says that isn’t true.

Recent research has shown that there is a predictable science behind achieving commercial success in any creative endeavor, from writing a popular novel to starting up a successful company to creating an effective marketing campaign.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Democratic candidate Antonio Delgado continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "Mission: Impossible – Fallout"

Upcoming:

  • The Philadelphia Orchestra: Young Virtuosi—Carnival of the Animals (Saint-Saens, Elgar, Britten) Saratoga Performing Arts Center, Saratoga Springs, Thursday 8/9, 2 PM
  • Sylvia Tyson with violinist Scarlet Rivera - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Thursday 8/9, 7 PM
  • "She Loves Me" - Theater Barn, New Lebanon, opens Thursday 8/9 at 8 PM, through Aug. 19
  • "Little Annie Rooney" - Pine Hills Film Colony at Steamer No. 10 Theatre, Albany, Saturday 8/11, 7 PM
  • Ajkun Ballet Theatre: Don Quixote Suite - The Egg, Albany, Saturday 8/11, 7:30 PM
  • Boston Pops: John Williams Film Night - Tanglewood Shed, Lenox, Mass., Saturday 8/11, 8 PM
  • Skerryvore, Schenectady Pipe Band - Agnes MacDonald Music Haven, Sunday 8/12, 7 PM
  • American Idol Live! - Palace Theatre, Albany, Monday 8/13, 8 PM
  • "Guardians of the Galaxy" - Times Union Center outdoor screens, Albany, Monday 8/13, 6:30 PM (“fun & games”), 7:30 PM
  • Skeeter Creek, Sydney Worthley - Rockin on the River, Riverfront Park, Troy, Wednesday 8/15, 5-8:30 PM

New movies: "Generation Wealth," "The Meg," "BlacKkKlansman," "Slender Man"

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